best dslr for amateur photography

Entry-level  DSLRs for beginners offer a step up in image quality from a cell phone’s camera without demanding too much of technical knowledge. Best starter cameras demand greater manual control, and you will be required to change lenses according to different photography projects. If you have already started worrying, then do not, because nowadays, there are many auto modes available to aid you till you get comfortable with other controls of the best professional cameras for beginners. Although, we would still recommend that you choose according to what your pocket allows. To make your task easy, we have combined a list of top 10 best cameras for beginners and the Best Dslr For Amateur Photography, which provide some of the best features, and at the same time, do not leave a hole in your pocket. Before we move on to reviewing these products, it is wise to look at some of the considerations you should definitely keep in mind before buying the best DSLRs for beginners.

The basic principle that you need to understand before buying a best beginner camera is that the more you are willing to pay, the more features you will receive. However, it is important to question whether you need such high-tech features or not. If you really want to get into photography in the near future, and not only use the camera for recreational purposes, then you can surely go for multi-featured professional cameras.

best dslr for amateur photography

Sony a6100 ($40* for 3 Day Rental)

The Sony a6100 retails for under $750*, weighs under a pound, and is compatible with Sony E mount lenses. It has a 24 megapixel APS-C sensor, which will produce images that are 6000 x 4000 pixels. It shoots UHD 4K up to 30 FPS in XAVC S and will shoot slow motion in 1080p up to 120 FPS. The sensor captures at the Super 35mm size, which is standard for the video world. Connect an external mic easily to the camera via the 3.5mm jack and flip the LCD screen up 180º for vlogging.

Quick Specs

• Crop Frame 24MP Sensor
• 100-32000 (Extended Mode: 100-51200) ISO
• 11 Frames Per Second Shooting Speed
• 1 UHS-I SD Card Slot
• Mirrorless, Electronic Viewfinder
• Tilting Touchscreen
• Battery Lasts Approximately 380-420 Shots/70-125 Mins Recording

This camera is ideal for vlogging, traveling, and action. It will record clips up to 30 minutes at a time. It does not offer S-Log2, S-Log3, or HLG (HDR) profiles. With Real-Time Eye AF functionality, high AF point coverage, and a fast shooting speed, this camera is a great choice for wildlife, events, kids, and sports. It also has a popup flash, which unfortunately means it is not completely weather sealed. It is only 2.34″ deep and under 5″ wide.

Canon 90D

Canon 90D ($50 for 3 Day Rental)

This camera retails for about $1,200, clocks in at 1.5 lbs, and is compatible with Canon EF mount lenses, which is an extremely popular mount type offering probably the biggest variety in lens choice. It has a 32 megapixel APS-C sensor, which will produce images that are 6960 x 4640 pixels. It shoots UHD 4K up to 30 FPS in MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 and will shoot slow motion in full HD up to 120 FPS. Dual Pixel CMOS AF is included, providing smooth, natural camcorder-like focusing you normally only see in higher-end Canons. Connect an external mic easily to the camera via the 3.5mm jack and the LCD screen is fully articulated for vlogging.

Quick Specs

• Crop Frame 32MP Sensor
• 100-25600 (Extended Mode: 100-51200) ISO
• 11 Frames Per Second Shooting Speed
• 1 UHS-II SD Card Slot
• DSLR, Optical Viewfinder
• Fully Articulating Touchscreen
• Battery Lasts Approximately 1300 Shots (Mins Recording Data Unavailable)

The Canon 90D is ideal for those wishing to shoot with a DSLR and with Canon EF lenses who need something with a little bit of everything but who don’t want the expense of a full frame body. It will record clips up to 30 minutes at a time, accepts an optional external battery grip, and has a hot shoe with a build-in popup flash. Unfortunately, the popup flash means it is not completely weather sealed. It is 3″ deep and over 5.5″ wide.

Canon EOS RP

Canon EOS RP ($47 for 3 Day Rental)

This camera retails for just shy of $1,000, is just over a pound, and is compatible with Canon RF mount lenses, which are new and very high quality but don’t offer a ton of variety yet. With an adapter, you can use this camera with Canon EF lenses, too. It has a 26 megapixel full frame sensor, which will produce images that are 6240 x 4160 pixels. It shoots UHD 4K  with a 1.8x sensor crop up to 24 FPS in MPEG-4 AVC/H.264. Recording with 4:2:2 sampling and 8-bit color depth is possible with an optional external recorder via HDMI. Dual Pixel CMOS AF is not available in 4K mode and there is no integrated Canon Log. Connect an external mic easily to the camera via the 3.5mm jack and the LCD screen is fully articulated for vlogging.

Quick Specs

• Full Frame 26MP Sensor
• 100-40000 (Extended Mode: 50-102400) ISO
• 5 Frames Per Second Shooting Speed
• 1 UHS-II SD Card Slot
• Mirrorless, Electronic Viewfinder
• Fully Articulating Touchscreen
• Battery Lasts Approximately 250 Shots (Mins Recording Data Unavailable)

The Canon EOS RP is a relatively affordable full frame mirrorless camera with a huge, new high quality mount type that is both exciting and…inconvenient. Use of Canon EF lenses will require an adapter. The new Canon RF lenses are sharp and fast, however. This camera does not have very high shooting speeds but does excel mightily in light sensitivity. It is weather resistant but lacks a flash (hot shoe only). At only 2.8″ deep and 3.3″ tall, you’re not going to get a better travel companion with a full frame sensor than the EOS RP.

Fuji X-T30 ($43 for a 3 Day Rental)

Retailing for just under $800, the Fuji X-T30 is the latest in a long line of beloved X-series cameras. It has a 26 megapixel APS-C sensor, which will produce images that are 6240 x 4160 pixels. It shoots DCI 4K up to 30 FPS in MOV/H.264 and slow motion in full HD up to 120 FPS. Recording with 4:2:2 sampling and 10-bit color depth is possible with an optional external recorder. The recording limit in 4K is 10 minutes at a time. There is an external mic port and the LCD screen tilts down for shooting at low and weird angles.

Quick Specs

• Crop Frame 26MP Sensor
• 160-12800 (Extended Mode: 80-51200) ISO
• 8 Frames Per Second Shooting Speed (Up to 30 at 16.6MP)
• 1 UHS-I SD Card Slot
• Mirrorless, Electronic Viewfinder
• Tilting Touchscreen
• Battery Lasts Approximately 300 Shots/60 Mins Recording

Sporting a classic, retro design, the Fuji X-T30 has prominent physical controls making this a great camera to transition to from the film world or for learning manual shooting in a really clear way. While not particularly light sensitive, ultra fast, or super robust for video, it is still good in all those areas plus very sharp thanks to the X-Trans sensor that uses a randomized pixel array, providing a high degree of image quality and sharpness due to the omission of an optical low-pass filter. Compared to other pixel patterns, the X-Trans design better mimics the look of film. It has a hot shoe with a built-in popup flash but is not weather sealed. It is only 1.8″ deep, just under 5″ wide, and less than a pound. It is compatible with a wide array of Fuji X-mount lenses.

Nikon Z6

Nikon Z6 ($70 for 3 Day Rental)

Nikon has joined the full frame mirrorless camera party with their $1,695 “all-arounder” Z6. Like its Canon counterpart, this new system also has a new, large mount type but will accept Nikon F lenses with an adapter. Nikon’s new line of Z mount lenses are ultra fast with high resolving power but so far there are not many to choose from. This camera has a backside-illuminated 25 megapixel sensor for 6000 x 4000 pixel files. It records in UHD 4K up to 30 FPS in MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 and slow motion in full HD up to 120 FPS. The ISO range really shines with an (extended) 50-204800 range.

Quick Specs

• Full Frame 25MP Sensor
• 100-51200 (Extended Mode: 50-204800) ISO
• 12 Frames Per Second Shooting Speed
• 1 XQD Card Slot
• Mirrorless, Electronic Viewfinder
• Tilting Touchscreen
• Battery Lasts Approximately 330-400 Shots/85 Mins Recording

Supporting these features is a major first for Nikon: in-body image stabilization, which can be stacked with VR-equipped lenses. The sensor is used in its entirety and gives you the option of shooting 5K-equivalent footage in crop mode. Shoot in Nikon’s N-Log, which enables the capturing of flat footage with 1,300% improved dynamic range (12 stops). This gives editors the most latitude to work with in post production and provides ultimate creative control when color grading. With a touch-to-focus feature on the LCD, an EVF with virtually zero lag, and a durable build that is like having a baby flagship Nikon D5, the Z6 a practical choice for video/stills hybrid shooters. It is barely over a pound and runs approximately the same size as the EOS RP/R systems: just over 5″ wide, 4″ tall, and 2.7″ deep.

Panasonic S1

Panasonic S1 ($100 for 3 Day Rental)

In keeping with the major trend of 2019, Panasonic has also been admitted into the full frame mirrorless club with their S system. Here we’re only featuring the S1. It’s the most “hybrid” of the 3 models – S1, S1R, and S1H. It’s also the least prohibitively expensive. For those looking for serious video specs, please see the S1H (which will set you back close to $4,000). The S1 retails for about $2,500 and marries a lot of the features needed by both serious videographers and photographers. It, too, is equipped with a large, new mount system. Panasonic worked alongside the L Mount Alliance (consisting of Leica and Sigma) to develop high quality L mount lenses to pair with this camera.

Quick Specs

• Full Frame 24MP Sensor
• 100-51200 (Extended Mode: 50-204800) ISO
• 9 Frames Per Second Shooting Speed
• 1 UHS-II SD Card Slot, 1 XQD Card Slot
• Mirrorless, Electronic Viewfinder
• Tilting Touchscreen
• Battery Lasts Approximately 400 Shots/85 Mins Recording

Enjoy pro-level, unlimited video recording at 4:2:2 sampling and 10-bit color depth internally at 4K 24p with V-Log, or capture slow motion up to 180 FPS in full HD. It sports 5-axis in-body stabilization, mic and headphone jacks, and a full size HDMI port for external recording. Photographers get the benefits of 6000 x 4000 pixel files, 9 different AF modes, and a 20x Manual Focus Assist – a great feature for macro and night sky shooters alike. The S1 also has a 6K Photo Mode as well as a new Flat Mode that gives you some of the post-processing latitude of RAW files but in smaller, more convenient JPEGs. There are actually too many little features like this to list here. The S1 is a tremendous choice for multi-disciplinary shooters. One big caveat? It’s a big camera: over 2 lbs, nearly 6″ wide, over 4″ tall, and nearly 4″ deep.

Sigma FP

Sigma fp ($75 for 3 Day Rental)

There are some big features inside Sigma’s super small full frame mirrorless fp camera. They borrowed design elements from pro cinema cameras and it doubles as a Director’s Viewfinder, which allows you to simulate different angles of view from the perspective of other cinema cameras, including the ALEXA Mini, the RED MONSTRO 8K, and more. Like the Panasonic S1, it pairs with L mount lenses. For around $1,800, the fp gives you internal 4K as well as 4K 4:2:2 12-bit in CinemaDNG format out over HDMI, super expansive ISO with an extended range from 6-102400, slow motion recording in full HD, and a signature “teal and orange” mode for a cinematic look.

Quick Specs

• Full Frame 25MP Sensor
• 100-25600 (Extended Mode: 6-102400) ISO
• 18 Frames Per Second Shooting Speed
• 1 UHS-II SD Card Slot
• Mirrorless, Electronic Viewfinder
• Fixed Touchscreen
• Battery Lasts Approximately 280 Shots/70 Mins Recording

With an attractive, utilitarian build, the fp is fitted with 1/4″-20 mounting points on both sides as well as the bottom for ultimate flexibility with accessories. Sigma optimized their UI specifically for switching between Still mode and Cine mode with just a flick of a switch. There are specially-designed operation systems for each mode. The entire layout is streamlined and ready to be built upon with just about any rig configuration you can imagine. It’s under 4.5″ wide, under 3″ tall, under 2″ thick, and less than a pound – perfect for any project requiring travel, such as documentary work, photojournalism, vacations, and events. This is the smallest and lightest full frame mirrorless camera on record, at least for right now.

Fuji X-T3

Fuji X-T3 ($62 for 3 Day Rental)

Now in its fourth generation, the sensor system inside the Fuji X-T3 uses a unique color filter array and a back-illuminated structure that enhances image quality with a high signal-to-noise ratio and reduced moiré, all without the use of an optical low-pass filter. This is coupled with the X-Processor 4, which helps enhance one of Fuji’s most popular features: film simulation modes. It also greatly improves subject tracking and video functionality thanks to the use of four CPUs, allowing you to get the most out of your 6240 x 4160 pixel images or 4K video. It costs around $1,200.

Quick Specs

• Full Frame 26MP Sensor
• 160-12800 (Extended Mode: 80-51200) ISO
• 11 Frames Per Second Shooting Speed (Up to 30 at 16.6MP)
• Dual UHS-II SD Card Slots
• Mirrorless, Electronic Viewfinder
• Tilting Touchscreen
• Battery Lasts Approximately 390 Shots/75 Mins Recording

Just like the X-T30, the X-T3 sports a classic, retro design with prominent physical controls that make this a great camera to transition to from the film world or for learning manual shooting in a really clear way. It is equipped with a large .5″ electronic viewfinder with a high magnification ratio of 0.75x that exhibits virtually zero lag and has an approximate 100 FPS refresh rate – a great choice for those uncertain about making the jump to electronic viewfinders since this one is so high quality. What’s more, the EVF’s diopter is lockable to prevent any unwanted adjustments. The tilting touchscreen has increased contrast and better viewing angles than prior models.

In addition to these advances, Fuji maintains their famous film simulations while offering a few new expressions: Monochrome Adjustment (create warm or cool-toned versions of Monochrome), ACROS, and Color Chrome. Offering all the ports you could need (microphone, headphone, USB-C, and more) plus full weather sealing, the X-T3 is a great multimedia tool that’s ideal for casual and serious shooters alike.

Sony a6600

Sony a6600 ($55 for 3 Day Rental)

The Sony a6600 is similar in almost every way to the a6100. They both have 425 AF points, 11 FPS shooting speed, 4K recording, and 24MP sensors. But there are a few key differences with the a6600: unlimited recording (limited only by battery/card), 5-axis in-body image stabilization, Eye AF for video, a slightly bigger buffer, a 3.5mm headphone jack (both cameras have mic jacks), a deeper grip, and much better battery life – but it’s also nearly double the price at $1,398.

Quick Specs

• Full Frame 24MP Sensor
• 100-32000 (Extended Mode: 100-102400) ISO
• 11 Frames Per Second Shooting Speed (Up to 30 at 16.6MP)
• 1 UHS-I SD Card Slot
• Mirrorless, Electronic Viewfinder
• Tilting Touchscreen
• Battery Lasts Approximately 720-810 Shots/140-250 Mins Recording

For the same small size, you get a bit more video-shooting heft with the a6600 when compared to other models in this series. Boasting a full-pixel readout with no pixel binning, the a6600 is equipped to deliver high-resolution 4K video to HDR(HLG) and S-Log/S-Gamut with options for slow motion up to 120 FPS. The high-bitrate (up to 100Mbps for 4K 30p/24p) XAVC video codec ensures professional-quality footage in a user-friendly format. With built-in 5-axis image stabilization borrowed from the acclaimed a7 series, this camera compensates for shake thanks to a highly accurate gyro sensor. The screen flips up 180° to not only more easily frame vlogging-style shots but also control a variety of functions while in front of the camera. It’s the ideal travel camera that doesn’t sacrifice pro-level settings.

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