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On the following note we will be talking alot best full frame camera under 500 different machine and the most important factors you need to know before getting really great machine according to the latest price and contract rumors, it has been a wild ridethe year ahead will bring more questions about original machine and full frame dslr, full frame camera under 1 lakh, cheapest full frame camera how to use them and get information of great prices on this blog will offer some answers. See benefit from Gegumall where we provide affordable prices.09:21 Despite all the technological advances that can be found in shiny new cameras the Canon 6D is still a great camera cheapest full frame camera used,cheapest full frame camera price in india. And just because other cameras have advanced significantly since 2012 this does not automatically make the Canon 6D over the hill, past its sell by date, irrelevant or obsolete.

If you’re looking to join the full-frame camera club, but you don’t know where to start, then this list is the place for you.

This list of the cheapest full-frame cameras is a must-read for all photographers interested in changing to a larger sensor size, especially if you’re on a budget.

Here’s our list of the 12 best budget full-frame cameras in 2021.

Should you switch to a full-frame camera?

A full-frame sensor is nearly 2.5 times bigger than an APS-C sensor. If you compare a crop sensor and a full-frame sensor with the same amount of megapixels, the full-frame will get you better image quality and light-gathering power. And it’s all because a full-frame sensor has bigger photo sites to capture the light.

So, are you ready to make the switch? Here are our top picks.

1: Canon EOS 6D Mark II

Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: Full-frame
  • Resolution: 26.2MP
  • Lens mount: Canon EF
  • Screen: 3-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots
  • Viewfinder: Optical
  • Max burst speed: 6.5fps
  • Max video resolution: 1080p
  • User level: Enthusiast/professional

The Canon EOS 6D Mark II is a superb full-frame camera. The CMOS sensor has a highly respectable resolution of 26.2MP, and the image quality is fantastic.

This Canon also features a 45-point autofocus system, which is great for capturing moving subjects. In addition, the expandable ISO range of 102,400 allows you to capture beautifully detailed shots even when light levels are low.

The Canon EOS 6D Mark II is not the cheapest full-frame camera on this list, and the camera’s lack of 4k video capabilities is a drawback. So videographers might want to think twice before buying one.

The Canon EOS 6D Mark II has its limitations, but that’s not to say it’s not a great full-frame camera. A perfect choice for serious enthusiasts. But, even professional photographers won’t be disappointed with the results.

2: Sony A7 II

Sony A7 II
  • Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor: Full-frame
  • Resolution: 24.3MP
  • Lens Mount: Sony E
  • Screen: 3-inch tiltable, 1,228,800 dots
  • Viewfinder: Electronic
  • Max Burst Speed: 5fps
  • Max Video Resolution: 1080p
  • User Level: Enthusiast/professional

If you’re new to the world of full-frame cameras, then the Sony A7 II could be the place to start. While it’s at the cheaper end of the A7 range, the images still stand up to the competition.

The 24.3MP sensor is perfectly respectable. And its 117-point autofocus and in-body image stabilization systems really make the Sony A7 II good value for money.

However, for action photographers and videographers, the lack of 4K video and a slow burst rate means the Sony A7 II isn’t the camera for them.

3: Nikon D750

Nikon D750
  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: Full-frame
  • Resolution: 24.3MP
  • Lens Mount: Nikon F
  • Screen: 3.2-inch tilting touchscreen, 1,228,000 dots
  • Viewfinder: Optical
  • Max Burst Bpeed: 6.5fps
  • Max Video Resolution: 1080p
  • User Level: Enthusiast/professional

A Nikon D750 in 2021? Yes, definitely! If you’re a Nikon shooter and want to switch to a full-frame camera, the D750 is a great choice.

It is still capable of producing wonderful images. And, even though the video capability is only 1080p, not 4K, the quality is good enough for enthusiasts.

The dynamic range is impressive, and the 51-point autofocus system still holds its own when it comes to low-light shooting.

The Nikon D750 is not the most up-to-date full-frame DSLR, but its age means that you can find some bargains out there.

4: Canon EOS RP

Canon EOS RP
  • Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor: Full-frame
  • Resolution: 26.2MP
  • Lens Mount: Canon RF
  • Screen: 3-inch fully articulating touchscreen, 1.04m dots
  • Viewfinder: Electronic
  • Max Burst Speed: 5fps (One Shot), 4fps (Servo AF)
  • Max Video Resolution: 4K
  • User Level: Enthusiast

The Canon EOS RP is one of the most affordable full-frame mirrorless cameras on the market.

It features excellent autofocus for stills, a comfortable ergonomics design, and strong low-light performance. Canon’s vari-angle touchscreen also makes it easy to use when getting those tricky angle shots. The Canon EOS RP does have some kinks in its armour, though.

When shooting in 4k, you’ll have to deal with poor autofocus performance and heavily cropped footage. In addition, the dynamic range of the Canon EOS RP is mediocre at best, and it doesn’t have in-body image stabilization like some rival cameras.

But despite all that, the picture quality and the price make the Canon EOS RP a great entry-level full-frame camera.

5: Sony A7R II

Sony A7R II
  • Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor: Full-frame
  • Resolution: 42.4MP
  • Lens Mount: Sony E
  • Screen: 3-inch tilting touchscreen, 1,229k dots
  • Viewfinder: EVF, 2,359k dots
  • Max Burst Speed: 5fps
  • Max Video Resolution: 4K
  • User Level: Enthusiast/professional

With the Sony A7R II, you might not get the cheapest full-frame camera. But, with its 42.4MP CMOS sensor, you are sure to get some knock-out images.

It also features 4K standard and 120fps slow-motion video. And, the high ISO range enables you to shoot in low-light without losing any image quality.

The poor battery life, lack of touch screen, and burst shooting speed of just 5fps are drawbacks. But, the Sony A7R II is one of the best full-frame cameras out there regarding image quality.

6: Nikon Z6

Nikon Z6
  • Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor: CMOS Full-frame
  • Resolution: 24.5MP
  • Lens Mount: Nikon Z
  • Screen: EVF
  • Viewfinder: EVF, 3,690k dots
  • Max Burst Speed: 12fps
  • Max Video Resolution: 4K
  • User Level: Enthusiast/Professional

There are more up-to-date Nikon mirrorless camera models on the market now, such as the Z6 II and Z7. But, the original Z6 is still worth considering. And, the release of newer models means the price of the Z6 will only go lower!

The 24.5MP image resolution doesn’t quite match up to the newer releases. But the image quality is still excellent.

The Nikon Z6 also has two features that have not been surpassed. It’s rapid 12fps shooting speed and the superb 4k video capture.

The Nikon Z6 is still at the forefront of the full-frame mirrorless camera market. And, as Nikon releases new mirrorless cameras, the N6 will become ever more affordable.

7: Sony A7 III

Sony A7 III
  • Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor: Full-frame
  • Resolution: 24.2MP
  • Lens Mount: Sony E
  • Screen: 3-inch tilting touchscreen, 922k dots
  • Viewfinder: EVF, 2,359k dots
  • Max Burst Speed: 10fps
  • Max Video Resolution: 4K
  • User Level: Enthusiast

If you’re looking for a budget full-frame camera for both stills and video, then the Sony A7 III might be the camera for you. It’s a cheaper alternative to the Sony A7R III but an upgrade from the A7 and A7 II.

You won’t be disappointed with the 24.2MP resolution for stills and 4k resolution for video capture. The 10fps burst mode for continuous shooting is also at a very high standard.

It’s not Sony’s latest instalment in their full-frame mirrorless camera range. But the quality holds up, and the Sony A7 II makes a fantastic budget option.

8: Canon EOS R

Canon EOS R
  • Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor: Full-frame
  • Resolution: 30.3MP
  • Screen: 3.2-inch, 2.1M-dot fully-articulating touchscreen LCD
  • Viewfinder: Electronic
  • Max Burst Speed: 8fps, 5fps with Servo AF
  • Max Video Resolution: 4K
  • User Level: Enthusiast/Advanced

The EOS R was Canon’s first full-frame camera to hit the market, and they got off to a good start.

This Canon handles well, and the reliable autofocus and electronic viewfinder make the EOS R a pleasure to use. In addition, the 30MP resolution, an 8fps burst, and 4K video make the EOS R a versatile full-frame camera.

It isn’t the cheapest, but it is good value for money. The Canon EOS R will meet the needs of many a photographer, whether street, travel, or portrait. If you are willing to spend a little more, it could be just what you’re looking for.

9: Nikon D810

Nikon D810
  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: Full-frame
  • Resolution: 36.3MP
  • Screen: 3.2-inch TFT-LCD screen
  • Viewfinder: Optical
  • Max Burst Speed: 5fps
  • Max Video Resolution: 1080p
  • User Level: Enthusiast/professional

Not the most recent release on the list, but the Nikon D810 still delivers where it matters most: image quality.

The slow burst and the 1080p video do limit the D810’s versatility. But, landscape photographers and portrait photographers won’t be disappointed. This camera offers excellent colour rendering and image quality from the impressive 36.3MP sensor.

The Nikon D810 was made to make great images, and the fact it still meets that brief means it cannot be ignored.

10: Nikon D610

Nikon D6-10
  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: Full-frame
  • Resolution: 23.3MP
  • Screen: 3.2-inch 921k-dot LCD screen
  • Viewfinder: Optical
  • Max Burst Speed: 6fps
  • Max Video Resolution: 1080p
  • User Level: Enthusiast/professional

If the D810 is more than you need, then maybe the Nikon D610 is a better option. It certainly is cheaper.

The 23.3MP CMOS sensor still packs a punch. And, the EXPEED 3 image processor produces exquisitely detailed pictures with a wide dynamic range.

Although it lacks WiFi connectivity and a movable screen, it does come with dual SD card slots essential for any professional.

While surpassed in some respects, the Nikon D610 is still a great way to enter the world of full-frame photography.

11: Sony A7 II

Sony A7 II
  • Type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor: Full-frame
  • Resolution: 24.3MP
  • Lens Mount: Sony E
  • Screen: 3-inch tiltable, 1,228,800 dots
  • Viewfinder: Electronic
  • Max Burst Speed: 5fps
  • Max Video Resolution: 1080p
  • User Level: Enthusiast/professional

If you’re new to the world of full-frame cameras, then the Sony A7 II could be the place to start. It’s at the cheaper end of the A7 range, but the images still stand up to the competition.

The 24.3MP sensor is perfectly respectable. And, its 117 point autofocus and in-body image stabilization systems really make the Sony A7 II good value for money.

But, for action photographers and videographers, the lack of 4K video and a slow burst rate means the Sony A7 II isn’t the camera for them.

12: Pentax K-1 II

Pentax K-1 II
  • Type: DSLR
  • Sensor: Full-frame
  • Resolution: 36.4MP
  • Screen: 3.2-inch pivoting screen, 1,037,000 dots
  • Viewfinder: Optical
  • Max Burst Speed: 4.4fps (6.4fps in APS-C crop mode)
  • Max Video Resolution: 1080p
  • User Level: Enthusiast/professional

Sony, Canon, and Nikon often dominate the headlines. But, if you’re more of a traditionalist, then the Pentax K-1 Mark II could be of some interest.

It’s built to last, with a durable and weather-sealed body. It is heavier than its DSLR rivals, but you can rest assured that the K-1 Mark II won’t let you down.

The 36.4MP sensor resolution and 5-axis in-body stabilization system make the Pentax K-1 Mark II a solid and reliable full-frame camera. It’s definitely one to consider if you need something highly reliable.

Conclusion

Switching from one sensor size to another has become a hot topic lately. A lot of photographers love to share why they’re switching and why you should too. The truth is, there is no right or wrong. It’s all a matter of preference and taste. Small sensors have their advantages but so do large ones.

With the tips in our article, you’re ready to buy the best full-frame camera for you in 2021.


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