best lens for canon 60d

Looking for recommended best lens for your Canon 60D? Here are the top rated Canon EOS 60D lenses. Canon EOS 60D has been one of most popular and leading mid-range DSLRs for years. In addition to capturing high quality images even at high ISOs, the Canon 60D offers a number of features like In-camera Raw conversion and creative filters, good ergonomics, well shaped and comfortable hand grip and high quality 1080/720p video output.

Below are the top recommended best lens for canon 60d portraits and best zoom lens for canon 60d camera. You can choose the one you need.

Best Lenses for Canon EOS 60D – Camera News at Cameraegg

Best Lens For Canon 60d

Full List of Recommended Canon EOS 60D Lenses

Best All-In-One Lenses for Canon EOS 60D

Canon EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS ($699): The Canon EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS is a very popular all-in-one compact and lightweight zoom lens for Canon APS-C DSLR cameras. It is ideal as a general-purpose zoom lens, providing coverage from a wide angle to a telephoto perspective. It features an Optical Image Stabilizer for up to 4-stops of effective correction even at full zoom. And the circular aperture can give beautiful background blur effects. Excellent high-speed performance at an affordable price.

LensPriceBuy Now
Canon EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS$699Amazon

Best Macro Lenses for Canon EOS 60D

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM ($899): Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS is a perfect lens for macro photography – flowers, insects, wedding details and underwater macro photography. The Hybrid Image Stabilization Technology effectively compensates for both angular and shift camera shake during close-up shooting. This is also an ideal lens for portraits and comes with sharp, great and low light performance.

LensPriceBuy Now
Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM$899Amazon

Best Standard Zoom Lenses for Canon EOS 60D

Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art ($799): The first and fastest of its kind – Truly a revolutionary product, the Sigma 18-35mm 1.8 DC HSM is the first wide-angle to standard zoom lens to achieve a large aperture of 1.8. The 18-35mm is ideal for landscapes, portraits, still life, snap shots, casual, and close-ups and the Hyper Sonic Motor (HSM) ensures smooth, fast and accurate autofocusing. A 9 blade rounded diaphragm also creates beautiful background blur. The Sigma 18-35mm 1.8 DC HSM is a new benchmark in photographic history and a must have for every camera bag.

Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM ($879): A fantastic Lens: impressive low light performance, fast and quiet AF action, great bokeh, excellent sharpness, and minimal distortion – The lens features a large circular aperture that produces a shallow depth of field, creating background blur that draws special attention to the photographic subject. The lens construction, meanwhile, includes UD and aspherical elements that deliver impressive image quality throughout the entire zoom range. And thanks to the Image Stabilizer lens groups–which shift to compensate for camera shake–the image appears crisp and clear on the image plane, eve in dim light.

LensPriceBuy Now
Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM$879Amazon
Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art$799Amazon
Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM$1,749Amazon
Tamron SP 24-70mm F2.8 Di VC USD Canon$1,299Amazon

Best Wide-angle Zoom Lenses for Canon EOS 60D

Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X116 Pro DX II ($469): Ultra wide zoom with top image quality! Best wide angle lens for a crop sensor. If you’re looking for an ultra wide angle lens for your crop sensor (APS-C) camera, go get this lens right now!

Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM ($299): Great wide angle lens with affordable price! The EF-S 10–18mm f/4.5–5.6 IS STM lens combines optical excellence with cutting-edge performance, providing an ultra-wide angle of view in a compact, portable package, perfect for EOS cameras with an APS-C sensor. It can deliver reliable, speedy and quiet wide-angle performance, making it an ideal lens for everyday photography, travel, stills and video recording.

Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM ($649): Excellent optical quality and Superior AF performance and speed. This lens takes really sharp wide angle photos. Another choice!

LensPriceBuy Now
Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X116 Pro DX II$469Amazon
Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM$299Amazon
Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM$649Amazon

Best Telephoto Zoom Lenses for Canon EOS 60D

Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6L IS USM ($1,349): The Best zoom lens for Canon 60D: Excellent Image Quality, Solid build and Image Stabilization. Two mode optical Image Stabilization System increases usability by approximately four stops. Suitable for Nature, landscape, sports, travel photography and perfect for portraiture or to bring what’s far away up close.

Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM ($649): If you are looking for an affordable lens with great performance, this Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM is the lens you need. The lens’ USM AF is very quick, smooth and silent, and it features a zoom lock button that keeps the lens safe and secure when not in use or when being used at the shortest 70mm focal length setting. The EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 has Canon’s “Super Spectra” lens coatings for ideal flare-resistance, and is ideal for travel, sports, and general photographic applications. Improved Image Stabilizer technology provides up to three stops of “shake” correction, and the “Mode 2” option stabilizes images while panning with a moving subject.

Canon 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM ($299): Best telephoto zoom for video. It features Canon’s amazing STM stepping motor and a newly designed high-speed CPU, rear focus mechanism and improved AF algorithm for high-speed performance, supporting Canon’s Movie Servo AF for smooth, quiet and continuous focus adjustments. For photographers and videographers looking to add versatility and range to their lens collection, the new EF-S 55–250mm f/4–5.6 IS STM telephoto zoom lens is a dream come true. Compact and lightweight with Optical Image Stabilizer for up to 3.5* equivalent stops of shake correction, it extends the camera’s reach significantly, capturing sharp images of far away objects, even when handheld.

Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD: It’s a good performer. Very popular!!!

LensPriceBuy Now
Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6L IS USM$1,349Amazon
Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM$649Amazon
Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM$299Amazon
Tamron SP 70-200mm F/2.8 Di VC USD Canon$1,499Amazon

Best Prime (Portrait) Lenses for Canon EOS 60D

Below are the best prime (portrait) lenses for Canon EOS 60D.

Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM ($125): Compact and lightweight – an outstanding walk-around lens with affordable price – Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM is a great entry into the world of EOS prime lenses. With an 80mm effective focal-length on APS-C cameras, 50mm on full-frame cameras, it’s an excellent prime lens for portraits, action, even nighttime photography. Its bright maximum aperture of f/1.8 helps it not only to excel in low light, but also to capture gorgeous, sharp images and movies with beautiful background blur thanks to its circular 7-blade design.

Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Lens ($199): The Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Lens get 84% overall score and gold award from the the experts at DPReview. At a featherweight 4.6 oz, this is one of the lightest lenses in the EF family. And it can produces exceptional images with almost no distortion. And the STM functionality provides quiet, smooth and continuous autofocus during video operation. If you like wide angle the Canon 40mm is a pretty precise.

Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM ($399): Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM is very popular and it is one of the best portrait lenses for professional photographers as well as also suitable for street photography. It focuses extremely quickly (and in near silence) and produces very sharp and superb quality images. The lens’s f/1.4 speed, meanwhile, is perfect for available-light shooting. And Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM comes with great depth of field with excellent creamy bokeh.

Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art ($949): Professional Portrait Lens! With a large 1.4 aperture, the Sigma 50mm 1.4 prime lens is a pro level performer for shooting everything including portrait photography, landscape photography, studio photography and street photography. It is a full frame lens (50mm focal length) and it can be used on Canon APS-C cameras (80mm equivalent focal length). Super sharp!

LensPriceBuy Now
Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM$125Amazon
Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM$149Amazon
Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM$399Amazon
Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art$949Amazon
Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM A Canon$899Amazon
Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM$549Amazon
Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM$1,899Amazon
Sigma 85mm F1.4 EX DG HSM Canon$869Amazon

Best Wide-angle Prime Lenses for Canon EOS 60D

If you are looking for a wide-angle prime lens for your Canon 60D, I’ll recommend the new Sigma 20mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens (Canon). This lens is the world’s first 20mm Prime lens that has achieved the large aperture F1.4. It is a state of the art wide-angle prime lens designed for Full Frame cameras but will work with APS-C sensors as well. With class leading performance, this lens is ideal for landscape photography, videography, astrophotography, lowlight or indoor photography and event photography. Of course, the Canon EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM and EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM are the best and amazing, but too expensive! If you need a great lens with an affordable price, you can try the Samyang lens.

LensPriceBuy Now
Sigma 20mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art$899Amazon
Sigma 24mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art$849Amazon
Samyang 24mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC$467Amazon
Canon EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM$1,549Amazon
Canon EF 20mm f/2.8 USM$539Amazon
Canon EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM$539Amazon
Samyang 14mm f/2.8 IF ED UMC$329Amazon
Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM$2,099Amazon

Best Telephoto Prime Lenses for Canon EOS 60D

You can see the full list of telephoto prime lenses and choose the one you can afford.

Canon EF 100mm f/2 USM ($499): This 100mm high-speed and compact telephoto lens is ideal for portraits and low-light work. It is super-sharp (even wide-open), and has fast USM autofocus along with full-time manual focusing.

Canon EF 300mm f/4L IS USM ($1,349): High quality, stabilized telephoto lens. The EF 300mm f/4L IS USM is a compact telephoto lens featuring an Image Stabilizer that compensates for camera shake, allowing shutter speeds two stops slower than normal to be used without blur. Stabilization can be turned off in one direction to allow for panning.

LensPriceBuy Now
Canon EF 100mm f/2 USM$499Amazon
Canon EF 300mm f/4L IS USM$1,349Amazon
Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II USM$6,099Amazon
Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM$9,999Amazon
Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM$8,999Amazon
Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM$11,499Amazon

How to Buy a Digital Camera

1. Determine what you need

A mistake I see some digital camera buyers making is that they get sucked into buying cameras that are beyond what they really need. Some questions to ask yourself before you go shopping:

  • What do you need the camera for?
  • What type of photography will you be doing? (portraits, landscapes, macro, sports)
  • What conditions will you be largely photographing in? (indoors, outdoors, low light, bright light)
  • Will you largely stay in auto mode or do you want to learn the art of photography?
  • What experience level do you have with cameras?
  • What type of features are you looking for? (long zoom, image stabilization, large LCD display etc)
  • How important is size and portability to you?
  • What is your budget?

Ask yourself these questions before you go to buy a camera and you’ll be in a much better position to make a decision when you see what’s on offer. You’ll probably find the sales person asks you this question anyway – so to have thought about it before hand will help them help you get the right digital camera.https://da360a56a245c0803c5da779cd8113ff.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

2. Megapixels are NOT everything

One of the features that you’ll see used to sell digital cameras is how many megapixels a digital camera has.

When I first got into digital photography, a few years back, the megapixel rating of cameras was actually quite important as most cameras were at the lower end of today’s modern day range and even a 1 megapixel increase was significant.

These days, with most new cameras coming out with at least 5 megapixels, it isn’t so crucial. In fact at the upper end of the range it can actually be a disadvantage to have images that are so large that they take up enormous amounts of space on memory cards and computers.

One of the main questions to ask when it comes to megapixels is ‘Will you be printing shots’? If so – how large will you be going with them? If you’re only printing images at a normal size then anything over 4 or so megapixels will be fine. If you’re going to start blowing your images up you might want to pay the extra money for something at the upper end of what’s on offer today.

3. Keep in mind the ‘extras’

Digital-Camera-Accessories

Keep in mind as you look at cameras that the price quoted may not be the final outlay that you need to make as there are a variety of other extras that you might want (or need) to fork out for including:

  • Camera Case
  • Memory Cards
  • Spare Batteries/Recharger
  • Lenses (if you are getting a DSLR)
  • Filters (and other lens attachments)
  • Tripods/Monopods
  • External Flashes
  • Reflectors

Some retailers will bundle such extras with cameras or will at least give a discount when buying more than one item at once. Keep in mind though that what they offer in bundles might not meet you needs. For example it’s common to get a 16 or 32 megabyte memory card with cameras – however these days you’ll probably want something at least of 500 megabytes (if not a gigabyte or two).

4. Do you already own any potentially compatible gear?

Talking of extra gear – one way to save yourself some cash is if you have accessories from previous digital cameras that are compatible with your new one.

For example memory cards, batteries, lenses (remember that many film camera lenses are actually compatible with digital SLRs from the same manufacturers), flashes, filters etc.

5. DSLR or Point and Shoot?

Dslr-Point-And-ShootWhile digital SLRs are getting more affordable they are not for everyone. Keep in mind that they are usually bigger, heavier, harder to keep clean (if you’re changing lenses) and can be more complicated to operate than point and shoot. Of course there are some upsides also.

If you’re trying to make a decision between a point and shoot and DSLR you might want to read my previous posts titled Should you buy a DSLR or a Point and Shoot Digital Camera? and it’s companion piece How to Choose a DSLR.

6. Optical Zooms are King

Not all ‘zooms’ are created equal.

When you’re looking at different models of digital cameras you’ll often hear their zooms talked about in two ways. Firstly there’s the ‘optical zoom’ and then there’s the ‘digital zoom’.

I would highly recommend that you only take into consideration the ‘optical zoom’ when making a decision about which camera to buy. Digital zooms simply enlarge the pixels in your shot which does make your subject look bigger, but it also makes it look more pixelated and your picture ‘noisier’ (like when you go up close to your TV).

If you’re looking for a zoom lens make sure it’s an optical zoom (most modern cameras have them of at least 3x in length – ie they’ll make your subject three times as big – with an increasing array of ‘super zooms’ coming onto the market at up to 12x Optical Zoom).

7. Read reviews

Before buying a digital camera take the time to do a little research. Don’t JUST rely upon the advice of the helpful sales person (who may or may not know anything about cameras and who may or may not have sales incentives for the camera they are recommending).

Read some reviews in digital camera magazines or online to help you narrow down the field. There are some great websites around that give expert and user reviews on virtually every camera on the market – use this wonderful and free resource.

A little self promotion here – one such site is my Digital Photography Blog which is a site that collates the reviews of many sites from around the web. To use it best enter the camera’s model name that you’re looking for a review on in the search feature in the top right side bar. It’ll give you a link to a central page that has information on the camera as well as links to any reviews published online on that camera from around the web.

8. Hands On Experience

Photo by erinmariepage

Once you’ve narrowed down your search to a handful of cameras head into your local digital camera shop and ask to see and play with them. There’s nothing like having the camera in your hands to work out whether it suits your needs.

When I shop for a camera I generally use the web to find reviews, then I head into a street in my city with 4 camera shops side by side and I go from shop to shop asking for recommendations and seeing the cameras live in the flash. In doing this I generally find the same camera or two are recommended in most shops and I get to see them demonstrated by different people (this gives a more well rounded demo). I also get to play with it and get a feel for which one I could see myself using.https://da360a56a245c0803c5da779cd8113ff.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

9. Negotiate

After you’ve selected the right digital camera for you it’s time to find the best price.

Once again, I generally start online (on a site like our store) and do some searches to find the most competitive prices on the models I’m interested in. With these in hand I’m in a good position to be able to negotiate in person with local stores and/or with online stores. I generally find that retail stores will negotiate on price and will often throw in freebies. Online stores are more difficult – most bigger ones don’t give you the ability to negotiate but smaller ones often will if you email them.

Don’t forget to ask for free or discounted bonuses including camera cases, memory cards, extra batteries, filters, free prints, cases etc. I even know of a couple of stores that offer camera lessons that you can ask to be included. Some stores will also consider giving you a trade in on older gear.

I generally do negotiating from home on the phone and only go into a store to pick up the camera after a price is agreed upon.

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