best year impala to buy

If you are looking for the Best Year Impala To Buy, then look no further than this article. It includes best year for classic impala. Perhaps you are interested in the most popular impala year, then reading this article may help you.

Following the Federal Highway Act of 1956, the need for capable cars increased dramatically. In order to make a vehicle faster, bigger, and more powerful than the Bel Air, the Chevrolet Impala was born. Over the history of the Chevrolet Impala, the car has evolved dramatically. The Impala wasn’t always successful, either. This car was eliminated and re-introduced multiple times. Today, the Chevy Impala is a successful full-size sedan in Chevrolet’s impressive lineup. It’s been 58 years since the first Impala, so let’s take a look back at the history of the Chevrolet Impala Through the Years. 

best year for classic impala

Best Year Impala To Buy

1st Generation (1958)  

1958 Impala
1958 Impala ©General Motors
  • Released in 1957 as a 1958 model, the Impala began as the top trim level of the Chevrolet Bel Air and was priced at just over $2500. 
  • The first generation was available as a coupe or convertible. 
  • The ’58 Impala unique design cues including an altered roofline, plentiful chrome accents, and sculped fenders.
  • Other design features included triple tail lamps, dual headlamps, and a longer wheel base. 
  • A 4.6L V8 was the standard engine on the 1958 Impala. 

2nd Generation (1959 – 1960) 

1959 Impala
1959 Impala ©General Motors
  • For 1959 the Impala became its own model and received a major redesign emphasizing that the prior year’s model had begun with low, lean, and wide styling. 
  • The most recognizable feature of the 2nd generation Impala is the bat-wing rear end with its “teardrop” brake lights. 
  • Four-door sedans and hardtops were added to the lineup. 
  • The ’59 Impala utilized a new X-frame chassis. 
  • Though short lived, the 2nd generation Impala was Chevy’s best-selling model in 1960 with 473,000 units sold.  

3rd Generation (1961 – 1964) 

1963 Impala
1963 Impala ©General Motors
  • The 1961 featured a clean, more straight-forward exterior design. 
  • The Super Sport (SS) badge was introduced, featuring a 6.7L V8 engine, and with it the age of the muscle car began.  
  • A wagon body style was introduced. 
  • The triple taillights made a triumphant return.  
  • The 3rd generation is considered by some the greatest of all Impalas

4th Generation (1965 – 1970) 

1965 Impala
1965 Impala on netcarshow.com
  • The Impala was redesigned again, featuring a sharper angled windshield, reshaped vent windows, frameless side glass, and more. 
  • By this generation, Chevy sold over 1 million Impalas in the US in 1 year! 
  • Nine, that’s right, 9 V8 engines were available ranging from 4.6L to 7.4L. Even a 4.1L 6-cylinder engine was available. 
  • Due to falling sales, Chevy cut back on the SS line in ‘66, eliminating all but the SS 427.  
  • Sales continued to dwindle, and Chevy discontinued the SS Impala in 1969, having sold just 2,455 units that year.  
  • GM ditched the X Frame and transitioned to a full-width perimeter frame. 

5th Generation (1971 – 1976) 

1973 Chevrolet Impala
1973 Chevrolet Impala ©General Motors
  • The fifth generation arrived in distinctive seventies style with a larger, longer body. It was, up to that point, the largest Impala and largest Chevy ever produced. 
  • Performance offerings continued to be scaled back in this generation, as engines had lower compression rates to utilize both leaded and unleaded fuel. 
  • But a big block V8 in the form of the twin-turbo 454 was still available. 
  • The convertible was discontinued in 1972 and has never been re-introduced. 
  • To comply with federal safety standards, energy-absorbing bumpers were added in 1973. 
  • ’73 also saw the return of the Kingswood station wagon  

6th Generation (1977 – 1985) 

1978 Impala
1978 Impala
  • In response to the energy crisis, 6th gen Impalas shrunk in all dimensions. Long and low was out, a taller, more stout Impala was in. 
  • Car reviewer liked the shift with the ’77 Impala being named Motor Trend’s car of the year.  
  • Base price was $4,876 in 1977. 
  • The wagon and coupe variants were eliminated in ‘81 
  • By 1985, the Impala nameplate was retired officially retired. 
  • But the high trim Caprice saw a second life (similar to the Bel Air Impala) as it would continue on under its own nameplate through 1990.  

7th Generation (1994 – 1996) 

1994 Chevrolet Impala
1994 Chevrolet Impala ©General Motors
  • After a nine year hiatus, GM reintroduced the Chevy Impala with an SS concept at the ’92 LA Auto Show. 
  • The 1994 Impala debuted with a 5.7L V8 engine and a 4-speed automatic transmission. 
  • The base price was $22,495. 
  • This 4-door only Impala featured rounded exterior lines and echoed the long and low design of decades past. 
  • As SUV popularity rose, the Impala SS was eliminated again. 

8th Generation (2000 – 2005) 

2004 Impala
2004 Impala on netcarshow.com
  • Basically a rebadged Lumina, the Impala nameplate made another comeback in 2000. 
  • For the first time, the Impala was FWD and lacked a single V8 engine option. 
  • This Impala was only available as a sedan, utilizing GM’s W-body platform (same as the out-going Lumina). 
  • The SS trim returned in 2004, offering a supercharged 3.8L V6 that made 240 hp. 
  • This generation made its way into police fleets across the country. The “Police Package” came with the SS’s 3.8-liter V6. 

9th Generation (2006 – 2013) 

2006 Impala
2006 Impala on netcarshow.com
  • In 2006, Chevy redesigned the Impala with a simpler, rounded, large sedan approach.  
  • The Impala SS was now offered a 5.3L V8 engine that produced 303 hp. 
  • Chevy gave the non-SS Impalas with a variety of V6 engines but narrowed down to just the 3.6L V6 engine by 2013. 
  • By the end of this generation, Impala owners enjoyed MP3 capability, satellite radio, and Bluetooth as standard features. 

10th Generation (2014 – 2020) 

2014 Impala
2014 Impala on netcarshow.com
  • In 2014, the Chevy Impala received a long-overdue redesign, adding complex exterior sculpting, modern tech, and a more refined interior. 
  • Current engine options include a 2.5L 4-cylinder that produces 196 hp and a 3.6L V6 that produces 260 hp. 
  • Optional features include ventilated seats, Apple Carplay, Chevy MyLink, blind spot monitors, forward collision warnings, keyless ignition, rearview camera, parking sensors, Bose audio, navigation, and more. 
  • GM announced the official discontinuation of the Impala in late 2019. The final Impala is slated to come off the assemble line on the 28th of February 2020. 

most popular impala year

  • In 1969, Chevy offered “liquid tire chain,” a feature that sprayed an ice-melting liquid onto the tires at the push of a button. 
  • Kobe Bryant  owned a modified 1963 Impala. This car was listed on eBay for $125,000, but didn’t sell. 
  • The Chevy Impala was the last car to offer a bench seat, a feature discontinued after 2013. 

Similar Competitive Models 

Used Car Websites

Buying a new or used vehicle is a big decision — both financially and in terms of the amount of time we spend in our cars. And wouldn’t you know it, there’s an app for that. Cars, trucks, and SUVs of all types can be found online today. You don’t even need to leave your couch to research, browse, inquire, and finance your next vehicle.

Here are some of the best used-car websites around.

Autolist.com
Because it’s an aggregator (like Kayak.com), the easy-to-use Autolist site displays millions of vehicles from many different sources. Users can view details such as the length of time a given vehicle has been on the market, plus any price changes for that vehicle. Autolist has one of the highest-rated used-car apps available. It works with Android or iOS phones, and just like the website, it checks multiple online databases to help you locate your dream car. The app also has instant price-drop alerts and high-res pictures to help you find the best deals on the most local listings. Shoppers can even apply for financing. With family sharing, as many as six family members can share information through the app. Add to that reviews, industry insights, a Rotten Tomatoes-style aggregator of older vehicle reviews, and buyer’s guides to help steer you through the car-buying process.

Go to Autolist


shutterstock 427841161 (1)

Autotempest.com
Like some of the other websites here, AutoTempest’s search results are drawn from multiple sources. Their website and app work similarly to the others, including the ability to save searches. They have lots of other useful information as well, including an up-to-date blog, buying guides, and car reviews. While you can filter your searches, the criteria for doing so are much more limited, although some might consider it to be streamlined. Either way, the essential information is provided. Choices include make, model, distance, price, year, mileage, vehicle type, transmission, and whether it’s for sale from a private party or by a
dealer.

Go to Autotempest


Autotrader.com
Because Autotrader.com nearly predates the internet itself, its longstanding reputation has built up decades of trust. Available as a website since 1997, it has over 3 million listings drawn from 40,000 dealers and 250,000 private sellers, and its selection is immense. The website has a wide variety of filters that can help you narrow your search down to exactly the type of vehicle you’re looking for. You can save your searches and even apply for insurance and a loan.

Go to Autotrader


BringATrailer.com
Bring A Trailer used to be a listing of interesting cars for sale around the country, now it is a full-blown auction site, with rare and unusual vehicles selling for sometimes astounding figures. It is the place to find that social ride or merely kill endless amounts of time browsing high-dollar exotics and absurdly clean early 2000s commuters. Recently, a pristine 2000 Honda Civic SI sold for $50,000. If you are in the market for something unusual or are willing to pay top dollar for your dream car, check out BaT.

Go to Bring a Trailer


CarGurus.com
This is a company that seeks to build trust through transparency. You will find many of the same search options on their website as you’ll find on the other sites. However, you’ll also find the CarGurus valuation of a given vehicle based on typical search criteria on top of this. This algorithm is similar to the methods used by KBB. The information they use to make this determination includes comparable car listings and pricing data on vehicles that have recently sold. Ratings are based on mileage, trim, vehicle history, and a multitude of other factors. CarGurus rates each available car deal as being Overpriced, High, Fair, Good, or Great.

Go to CarGurus


Carmax.com
Carmax is a dealership specializing in high quality used cars, many available with the internet-famous Carmax warranty. This website isn’t the best for those looking for a killer deal because of their no-haggle policy, but it is an excellent place for people who want the most effortless car shopping and buying experience. For those looking for the ease of browsing and buying online, without the anxiety-inducing Craigslist test drive, Carmax can be a good option. Browse, buy, and the car can be ready for pick up, virtually all online or on their mobile app.

Go to Carmax


shutterstock 329553065 (1)

Cars.com
Cars.com is one of the largest automotive search engines. With thousands of listings covering almost every car, there is also a new tool that rates the value of used vehicles relative to the current market trends. Cars.com has fewer private sellers, but it’s a great way to search dealers in your area and compare pricing for similar vehicles. It also has extensive sorting options to narrow your search by the specs and features you are looking for and leaving out those you don’t want. In addition to consumer reviews, the site has now built up an extensive archive of expert reviews written by its editorial staff.

Go to Cars.com


CarsDirect.com
This site works to simplify buying a car, and like Autotrader and others on this list, they can help find financing. The search criteria include make, model, distance, price, mileage, year, color, engine, and even photo availability. CarsDirect also has buying guides, rankings, and vehicle comparisons. Like similar sites, you can save your searches and vehicles of interest. The website also has educational videos, including reviews, car news and reports, and tools that include a trade-in valuation.

Go to CarsDirect


Carvana.com
Carvana is another used car dealer that built a business around making the buying experience easier. Buy with confidence with a 7-day money-back guarantee, and have the car delivered to your door. All Carvana vehicles have accident free vehicle history and pass a 150-point inspection. You can also sell your vehicle to Carvana, even without buying from them. They claim you will get a real offer after filling out a form, which takes just a couple of minutes. With used car values near all-time highs, it may be a good time to see what your car is worth to them. Carvana is also the inventor of the car vending machine for those looking to buy in person. It’s a neat gimmick worth checking out.

Go to Carvana


shutterstock 1301070901 (1)

Craigslist.org
Primarily a classified site, Craigslist doesn’t have many fancy graphics or options, but the site’s selection is fairly broad, and postings usually include photos. You’ll need to be super savvy if you’re going this route because the site is rife with scammers, but it is possible to negotiate a worthwhile deal here. Search filters here include distance, price, make and model, year, mileage, condition, number of cylinders, drivetrain and fuel type, color, size, title status, vehicle type, and transmission type. A point of interest to some, some sellers on Craigslist might accept cryptocurrency like Bitcoin in exchange for the vehicle they’re selling. You can also create email alerts for the specific attributes of a vehicle that you’re looking for.

Go to Craigslist


eBay.com
eBay Motors isn’t just an auction site for rare vehicles anymore. There are thousands of used and new cars listed by dealerships and private sellers to peruse using classified-style listings. Whether you are shopping for a custom show car or a late model Chevy, eBay likely has at least one of those vehicles. Other great searches on eBay motors include the “Replica/Kit Make” section, as well as the “Racecar (Not Street Legal)” category. Just be careful in terms of trusting sellers since eBay makes it difficult to recoup any monies lost to fraud or misrepresented vehicles. A pre-purchase inspection by an independent third party is highly recommended if you’re not able to see the vehicle yourself in person before buying.

Go to eBay


Edmunds.com
Edmunds originated as a paperback booklet available at newsstands. Decades of experience have made this a well-respected name in the industry. The website allows you to save searches and favorites and also lets you filter your selections. Although their search functions look similar to the ones available on other sites, they often have more features and options to choose between. That allows buyers to narrow and refine more thoroughly. Edmunds also has a wealth of advice and articles to help educate people about the car-buying process and the vehicles themselves.

Go to Edmunds


EnterpriseCarSales.com
If you don’t mind a car with plenty of miles on it, Enterprise’s former rentals can be a good choice. They offer a no-questions-asked, seven-day “buyer’s remorse” period, in addition to their 12-month or 12,000-mile limited powertrain warranty and one year of roadside assistance. Enterprise also provides financing. Unlike most of the other sites mentioned here, the company sells cars only from one source: their retired rental fleets. They also take trade-ins and have special programs for college graduates or first-time car buyers. The website allows you to search by the monthly payment you can afford alongside the same criteria you’ll find on other sites.

Go to Enterprise Car Sales


Hemmings.com
For classic car, truck, or motorcycle collectors, this is a ‘don’t-miss’ destination. As well as vehicles, Hemmings helps you locate hard-to-find parts for project cars. Search for vehicles or parts by make, model, type, price range, and category. With more of a community feel to it, this site maintains a blog and regularly sends out newsletters. Hemmings also sells merchandise related to this niche market. They have an email list, fantastic videos, and special events, not to mention apps for Android and iOS, and several print publications to subscribe to.

Go to Hemmings


KBB.com
The words “Blue Book price” have been a part of the American vocabulary for nearly a century, and the Kelley Blue Book website and app both trade on this longstanding name recognition. Not only are they known for providing accurate estimates of your car’s market value, but their site has tools for checking your credit score and calculating car payments too. Expert reviews, top ten lists, and recall postings make this site a longtime go-to favorite for automotive information. They also cover motorcycles, snowmobiles, and personal watercraft such as jet skis. KBB even has an instant cash offer section on their website.

Go to Kelley Blue Book

Leave a Comment