boeing future heavy lift helicopter

In this post, we will be discussing Boeing Future Heavy Lift Helicopter, the mi 17 helicopter specifications and the mi 171 helicopter price. As the lead providers of Attack, Assault, and Heavy Lift Helicopters for the Department of Defense and with a proven track record and a demonstrated ability to exceed customer requirements for those missions with these programs of record, Boeing and Sikorsky have joined forces to develop the SB>1 DEFIANT™ for the DoD. The Sikorskyboeing Sb 1 Defiant is a fully integrated aircraft that represents an evolution of the military’s most capable platforms. Designed for the Army’s attack and assault missions as well as the Marine Corps long-range transportation, infiltration and resupply missions, the SB>1 DEFIANT™ is uniquely suited to provide the warfighter with unmatched capabilities for the U.S. Military’s various missions.

sikorskyboeing sb 1 defiant

aircraft features

Sikorsky and Boeing have designed the SB>1 DEFIANT™ to provide the right combination of speed, lift and range that are paramount to both the assault and attack missions while increasing overall maneuverability and agility. Developed with 85 percent commonality between attack and assault aircraft, the SB>1 DEFIANT™ will reduce development and life-cycle costs and ensure minimal disruption or loss of existing rotorcraft expertise. Its open mission systems architecture allows rapid technology and capability insertion to meet evolving FVL requirements and provide the U.S. Military with evolutionary sustainability, affordability and readiness for years to come.

Boeing Future Heavy Lift Helicopter

The aircraft’s capabilities are largely derived from the X2 rigid co-axial rotor system which has already proven its airworthiness through flights of the X2 and S-97 Raider. With two coaxial rotors on top that rotate in opposite directions, the extra lift from each rotor’s advancing blade balances out the diminished lift from the opposite side’s retreating blade to eliminate retreating blade stall. To provide the raw forward thrust for fast flight, the back of the SB>1 DEFIANT™ mounts a pusher propulsor, allowing the aircraft to fly twice as fast and twice as far as today’s conventional helicopter while increasing the overall maneuverability and agility required for specific mission objectives. This additional flight component also provides unique and unmatched maneuverability in all flight regimes including hover, low-speed flight and high-speed flight.

The perfect paradigm for upgradability and survivability in an open architecture environment, the SB>1 DEFIANT™ is ready to serve the U.S. Military for decades to come.

X2 Rotor System: A rigid, co-axial rotor system with pusher propulsor that provides improved mission objective capability, reduced wear on parts and systems, increased reliability and lower total lifecycle costs

Maneuverability and Agility: Improved agility and flight control augmentation allow tight assault formations with close proximity landings to deliver embarked troops as a cohesive unit and minimize exposure to hostile threats

Speed and Range: Twice the speed and distance of today’s conventional helicopters while increasing the overall maneuverability and agility needed for the US Military’s various missions

Survivability: Propulsor thrust coupled with large angular rates and precision attitude control enable the SB>1 DEFIANT™ to rapidly and precisely displace the aircraft position or flight path in response to threats or evolving tactical environments

Lethality: Rapid and precise acquisition of targets and prolonged engagement windows

Deployability: When folded for shipboard stowage, the SB>1 DEFIANT™ fits the footprint of a folded AH-1

boeing helicopters

The U.S. Army needs a faster, more survivable, longer range helicopter that meets its performance, cost, and schedule objectives while providing unmatched operational effectiveness on the highly contested battlefield of the future.

The SB>1 DEFIANT™ is uniquely suited to achieve those objectives. Its revolutionary compound design leverages game-changing technologies to offer an integrated solution with increased speed, range, maneuverability and survivability to extend the warfighter’s capabilities on the modern battlefield – all while fitting in the same footprint as its Black Hawk predecessor.

Through innovative design and development activities over the course of the Joint Multi-Role Technology Demonstration (JMR-TD) program, the SB>1 team has refined its understanding of the X2 Technology™ that can be leveraged to fill the capability needs of the Army’s Future Long Range Assault Aircraft (FLRAA). With the data gained from the wind tunnel, Power System Test Bed (PSTB) and test flights, this team is ready to take the next steps in designing an affordable, survivable and sustainable FLRAA solution.

aircraft features

A Helicopter Designed for the Army’s Air Assault Mission

The Sikorsky-Boeing team’s expertise in advanced manufacturing and testing, paired with its experience in producing cutting-edge rotorcraft configurations, has refined our understanding of the Army’s mission – enabling us to provide a flexible, agile, advanced solution with adaptable software and systems for future growth across multiple missions.

To replace the Black Hawk, the Army’s next-generation helicopter must conduct air assaults from extremely long distances and evade enemy anti-aircraft systems. It is crucial that the aircraft can fly at the lowest possible altitude with a precise combination of speed and maneuverability. The aircraft needs to land quickly in tight landing zones under fire, deliver soldiers, and immediately depart.

The SB>1 DEFIANT™ is specifically designed to demonstrate technology for the FLRAA mission. The helicopter’s superior handling qualities and speed allow it to safely get to the objective, perform the complex mission and depart quickly. The SB>1 team chose this configuration featuring coaxial rotors and a rear-mounted pusher propulsor for a specific reason – to achieve the common goal that they have with the U.S. Army to design the absolute best next-generation air assault aircraft.

Revolutionary Capabilities

The SB>1 DEFIANT™ integrates the world’s most modern, proven technologies to deliver a cutting-edge aircraft to meet the Army’s FLRAA requirements. DEFIANT™ – which maintains the Black Hawk footprint – will fly twice as fast and twice as far while increasing the overall maneuverability and agility required for specific mission objectives.

  • Improved Handling
  • Enhanced Survivability
  • Reduced Vulnerablility
  • Military Utility
  • Superior Sustainability
  • Improved Handling
    With a coaxial rigid rotor system and rear pusher propulsor, DEFIANT™ delivers revolutionary thrust and speed while simultaneously enabling rapid ingress / egress for unrivaled maneuverability and agility.

An Affordable, Sustainable Solution

The SB>1 DEFIANT™ team has demonstrated revolutionary advances in engineering and manufacturing, making their FLRAA offering an affordable reality today. The team’s design and development activities have refined their understanding of the technological solutions possible for the Army.

With the data gained from the wind tunnel, power system test bed (PSTB) and test flights, the Sikorsky-Boeing team is well on their way to delivering an aircraft that meets the Army’s needs. This is accomplished by:

  • Integrating modern, proven technologies into our design to ensure a low-risk, low-cost offer that is scalable to a variety of military missions.
  • Model-based engineering and advanced manufacturing that enhance our ability to minimize risk and program costs.
  • A rigorous flight test plan.
  • A design that maintains commonality with:
    • Army’s existing facilities – It is the same size as Black Hawk / Apache.
    • Current Army logistics and soldier skill sets (training).
    • Army’s major tactics, techniques and procedures to include multi-ship operations.
  • A maintenance-friendly design throughout, increasing availability and lowering lifecycle sustainment costs.
  • An early and continuous focus on reliability and maintainability to create maintenance-free periods and reduce forward logistics burdens, while establishing an affordable life cycle of sustainment.

How to Buy a Private Helicopter: 5 Things You Need to Know When You Are Buying a Private Helicopter

There are many benefits of owning a helicopter, including getting to work on time when living 100 miles (ca. 161 km) away from your office. The main advantage of owning a helicopter is freedom. Once you have permission and some space, you can set your course for any destination.

soaring over the sky!

Content List

  1. Will You Be the Pilot or the Passenger?
  2. Predetermine Your Budget
  3. How Far Will You Travel?
  4. Other Considerations
  5. Payment

A private owner in the United Kingdom can fly to Devon and back to London without stopping to refuel. A pub in Oxford, the Manson’s Arms, has a helipad. The photographs of helicopters that visit adorn the walls of the pub. It is a thrilling and bizarre place to visit.

Modern helicopters have engines that are quieter and more efficient with advanced glass cockpits that offer fewer distractions for pilots. Airbus Helicopters’ Ed Sale responded to GQ at the Elite London event giving insight into what to consider when buying a private helicopter.

1. Will You Be the Pilot or the Passenger?

The majority of helicopter owners are pilots so they can fly themselves. Private pilots and those who own a helicopter and fly themselves prefer hands-on, less bulky designs.

Bigger helicopters are usually reserved for professional pilots while the owners sit in the back. The big shots use this as their executive means of transport. Midrange helicopters have administrative abilities too but are fun to handle.

The bigger the aircraft, the more experience a pilot requires. A well-trained amateur can fly any of the Robinson chopper models. The same applies to the B3 and B4 Eurocopter Ecureuil, AgustaWestland Koala and Bell 407. If you are looking at bigger models, like the AgustaWestland A109 with more sophisticated instrumentation, you will need a professional pilot.

If planning to become a pilot, next choose a flying school. Lots of flying schools will issue Private Pilot Licenses PPLs(H). Ask friends with helicopters to recommend a good flying school.

It helps if the flying school is local to you as you need a minimum of 45 hours of training over 12 months. Training costs vary from school to school but expect it to cost around $26,200 (around £20,000). This covers your tests, exams, flying hours, medicals, equipment, and airfield fees.

Training at Heli Air, one of the UK’s largest Robinson helicopter distributors, will cost you $10,500 (around £8,000). This covers theory in subjects like meteorology, air law, and flight planning. A Class 2 medical is compulsory.

After qualifying, you need an annual review to renew your license. You can opt to expand your qualification to include formation flying and night flying. The choice is yours.

2. Predetermine Your Budget

Design, capacity, and the manufacturer determines a helicopter’s price. Set your budget right from the start. It helps narrow your search.

Just like cars, you will have a range of options. Sloane Helicopters marketing director, Giorgio Bendoni, says first-time buyers can choose from the two-seater, single-piston Robinson R22 to the twin-turbine, eight-seater AgustaWestland Grand. It depends on budget flexibility.

While helicopters are expensive, some are cheaper than a Lamborghini. The Robinson R44, the world’s most famous helicopter, costs only $350,000 (around £313,500) and half that second-hand.

When setting your budget, add maintenance costs too. Some helicopter’s cost more to maintain than others. Lower priced helicopters can cost more in maintenance over the long run.

The AgustaWestland Grand and the AgustaWestland A109 are great in sophistication and space, but with an annual depreciation of five to 10 percent, you may want to weigh your options.

You should also consider the cost of insurance, capital investment, and depreciation.

3. How Far Will You Travel?

Aircraft manufacturers offer similar models with a small tweak in design and performance. Cheaper helicopters are smaller. And this limits the number of people it can carry, fuel capacity, and distance it can travel.

So, you need to decide how many people need to travel in your helicopter regularly. Also look at the distance it can travel before needing to refuel. The H125 is a midrange helicopter that guarantees 300 to 350 miles (ca. 563 km) or 2½ hours without refueling.

4. Other Considerations

The Airbus H160 is a new sleek design marketed to business and private customers, while the H125 has strong competition from the Bell 407. The cabin is separate from the cockpit and is luxurious. It has two seats facing each other and is a great option if you have a pilot. In contrast, an Airbus is a better option with you as the pilot as there is no separation from your passengers.

The choice of interior should reflect the helicopter’s purpose. Some people ignore carpets as it is a lot of work to keep clean. Leather seats are an attractive option as are seats with twin leather stitching which are currently in vogue.

Landing Space is Limited

Landing spaces in London are limited due to their tight restrictions on noise control, which limits helicopter paths. Battersea Heliport is the best place to land and continue your journey using other means. Places you can land outside London include Elstree, Denham, Biggin Hill, and Northolt.

Grab a helicopter landing guide to find somewhere to land in London. It has a list of landing sites around the UK and their phone numbers. This allows you to request landing permission before leaving for your destination. They may let you land for free or for a small fee (around $50).

Terms You Should Know

There are terms you should know if you intend to own a helicopter:

  • VFR (Visual Flying Rules) means you have to keep sight of the ground.
  • IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) means you can fly above or in the clouds.
  • A two-seat piston engine VFR is a basic helicopter.
  • ILS (Instrument Landing System) is what you dial into to get to the ground.
  • You use a noise-canceling headset for communication.
  • Autopilot allows you to control the aircraft without moving the controls and is not available in all helicopters.

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