do you use toothpaste with electric toothbrush

Do you use toothpaste with electric toothbrush? Can you use whitening toothpaste with an electric toothbrush? Can you use whitening toothpaste with electric toothbrush? Do I use toothpaste with an electric toothbrush? Whatever your question and however you phrase it, we bring you answers to them all.  Read on….

Choosing the Right Toothbrush and Toothpaste

How much thought do you put into buying a toothbrush and toothpaste? When you enter that long aisle full of different brushes and pastes, do you have a game plan?

When it comes to any task, you need to have the right tools for the job.

If you’re a lumberjack, you don’t just pick out an ax at random or because it’s your favorite color.

You pick your ax based on quality and which one will help you get the job done quickest, while still achieving the best results.

The same rules need to apply for your toothbrush and toothpaste.

When brushing your teeth, you have a job to do, and you need to be sure you’re using tools that are going to do a good job.

In this blog, we will talk about the things you need to consider when picking out your toothbrush and toothpaste.

Do You Use Toothpaste With Electric Toothbrush

Choosing Your Toothbrush

Choose Soft Bristles

Most dentists will recommend using a brush with soft, round bristles.

And when you get your soft bristled brush, make sure you brush gently.

If you’ve always used a toothbrush with stiff bristles, this is probably a habit worth breaking.

A recent study found that brushing your teeth too hard with stiff bristles is a leading cause of sensitive teeth.

Give Electric Toothbrushes A Try

Maybe you’ve used manual toothbrushes since birth, and you consider yourself old school when it comes to toothbrushes.

That’s fine, as long as you’re still brushing as long and as thoroughly as you should be.

Choosing Electric Toothbrush

If an injury, arthritis, or just impatience is keeping you from brushing your teeth the way you should, consider switching to an electric toothbrush.

This is especially helpful if you’re trying to get a reluctant child to brush their teeth.

A fun new electric toothbrush might do the trick of convincing them to brush every day.

Find The Right Toothbrush Head

When picking out your toothbrush, don’t overlook the shape of its head.

One toothbrush shape is likely to fit your mouth better than another.

Your bristles need to be able to reach your back molars, and a head that is too large or wide may prevent that.

Floss and brush in front of a mirror to make sure you’re hitting every tooth.

If you’re unable to reach every tooth with your current toothbrush, you should go ahead and get a new one with a different head.

Don’t Go Cheap For The Sake Of Being Cheap

That ten pack of toothbrushes for $2 might seem like a steal, but you’ll likely pay for it in other ways.

There’s a good chance those toothbrushes were made by a company that didn’t have safety or efficacy in mind when designing the brushes.

They’re probably made of inferior and even unsafe materials.

Since your toothbrush is something you put in your mouth at least twice a day, it’s a good idea to go with a reputable manufacturer.

Use that ten pack of toothbrushes to clean your bathroom floors, not your teeth.

Choosing Your Toothpaste

Fluoride Is Important

Most dentists agree that fluoride is essential when it comes to cleaning our teeth.

Finding a toothpaste with fluoride isn’t an issue as most toothpaste options contain it.

Brushing your teeth twice a day using toothpaste that contains fluoride is a staple of good oral hygiene and health.

The importance of fluoride is based on proven cavity-fighting properties.

If you use a natural toothpaste, there’s a chance it doesn’t contain fluoride.

To get the most out of your toothpaste, and to keep your mouth as healthy as possible, it’s a good idea to use fluoride.

Ask Your Dentist For Recommendations

If you have any questions about toothpaste, ask for dentist recommendations.

This is especially helpful if you’re experiencing any issues with your teeth or oral hygiene as a whole.

Based on your symptoms, he could recommend a whitening toothpaste or a toothpaste for sensitive teeth.

Choosing the right toothpaste | Hylan Dental Care

You can then buy any toothpaste you want inside of that category, but certain toothpaste types will be better for specific dental issues.

If your dentist tells you to avoid any toothpaste, make sure you heed their advice.

Read The Toothpaste Label

Some toothpaste will be good for adults, but not children. Others will be best for whitening purposes, while others are designed for sensitive teeth.

Before your blindly buy toothpaste, make sure you read the label, including all of the fine print.

You want to follow any instructions they give, and you should also pay attention to the ingredient list.

Most toothpaste contains flavoring, sweeteners, and a variety of chemical ingredients.

The longer the list of ingredients, the better chance you have at being sensitive to something in the toothpaste.

If you struggle with tooth sensitivity, make sure you know what each ingredient is.

Look For The ADA Seal Of Approval

Most toothpaste will carry the ADA seal of approval.

That means that the toothpaste has met every requirement of the American Dental Association.

Participation in the program is voluntary, though, and not every brand chooses to participate.

There are good brands that choose not to participate, so don’t use this as your only criteria when deciding.

However, when you see the ADA seal, you can rest assured that you’re getting a quality toothpaste.

Choose Your Toothbrush and Toothpaste Wisely

Choosing the right toothbrush and toothpaste isn’t a good time to bargain shop.

Dental hygiene and health are critical, and you should be sure you have the right tools for the job.

Using the guide above, the next time you go shopping for your toothbrush and toothpaste, you will be able to make an informed decision, and get what’s best for you!

Proper oral hygiene habits

Remember that on top of proper at-home oral hygiene habits, it is essential to visit your dentist for routine teeth cleanings and check-ups.

Hylan Dental Care is here to help!

Click the button below to get started booking your appointment!

How to Brush Your Teeth Properly

Brushing your teeth every day isn’t just a way to keep your mouth feeling clean. It’s a way to keep your whole body healthy, too.

The American Dental Association recommends brushing twice per day, for 2 minutes each time.

When you brush correctly, you eliminate the plaque buildup and bacteria that can otherwise collect between your teeth and on your tongue. This can prevent gum disease and tooth decay, as well as promote a stronger immune system and a healthier lifestyle.

We cover the ins and outs of brushing correctly, no matter your circumstance.

What you need to brush your teeth

The first step to brushing correctly is making sure you’re prepared with the right tools. You’ll need:

Your toothbrush should be replaced every 3 to 4 months. If your toothbrush has been overused, the bristles can become frayed and brushing loses some of its efficacy.

fluoride toothpaste that’s approved by the American Dental Association is the best choice for most adults.

Fluoride fortifies your teeth against decay. Some very young children shouldn’t use fluoride toothpaste. However, the ADA still recommends that:

  • children younger than age 3 whose first teeth have come in can use a smear of fluoride toothpaste about the size of a rice grain
  • children 3 to 6 can start using a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste

Special fluoride-free toothpastes also exist for younger kids if you’re worried about them swallowing the toothpaste.

How to brush your teeth properly, step by step
how to brush your teeth, teeth, brush teethShare on Pinterest
Brushing your teeth should take about 2 minutes.

The simplest way to brush your teeth involves your standard plastic-handled, nylon-bristled toothbrush.

The entire process should take about 2 minutes. Practice timing yourself until you get used to how long 2 minutes feels when you’re brushing.

  1. Lubricate your brush with a small amount of water. Put a small amount of toothpaste — about the size of a pea — on the head of the toothbrush.
  2. Insert the toothbrush into your mouth at about a 45-degree angle to your gums and use gentle, short strokes to brush your front teeth.
  3. Brush the outside surfaces of your teeth, making sure to get the back molars and upper areas of your chewing surfaces.
  4. Flip the toothbrush upside down to get the inside surface of your top front teeth. Flip it back around to get the inside surface of your bottom front teeth.
  5. Brush your tongue to get rid of any bacteria buildup or plaque that has gotten stuck there during the brushing process.
  6. Spit out the remnants of toothpaste, saliva, and water into a clean sink. Finish by rinsing your mouth with cold water.
How to brush your teeth with an electric toothbrush

Brushing your teeth with an electronic toothbrush head is slightly different since the brush head rotates or vibrates on its own.

  1. Prepare your toothbrush by rinsing it with a little bit of water. Add a pea-sized amount of toothpaste on top.
  2. Turn on your electric toothbrush and start at the back bottom row of your teeth, holding the head at a 45-degree angle toward the gum line.
  3. Applying light pressure, move methodically, one tooth at a time, buffing each tooth with the rotating vibrating brush head.
  4. Switch to the back top row of your teeth and repeat, cleaning and polishing one tooth at a time.
  5. Use the electronic brush head to stimulate and clean your tongue, moving it slowly across your tongue’s surface.
  6. Spit out the remnants of toothpaste, saliva, and water into a clean sink. Finish by rinsing your mouth with cold water.
How to brush your teeth with braces

Brushing your teeth with braces is pretty straightforward, but it does take a couple of extra steps.

  1. Start by removing any rubber bands or removable parts of your braces. These should be rinsed before reapplying them to your braces.
  2. Get your toothbrush ready with a little bit of water and a pea-sized amount of toothpaste.
  3. Carefully clean around your braces, including under the wires and pins.
  4. Brush the actual wires of your braces so that they’re free of any food particles that could cause plaque or bacteria buildup.
  5. Brush your teeth as you normally would, moving from one side of your mouth to the other and spending at least 2 minutes on brushing.
  6. Gently brush your tongue.
  7. Spit out any remaining toothpaste and saliva. Rinse your mouth with water and check the mirror to make sure your braces have been fully cleaned.
How to brush your teeth with spacers

Spacers, also called separators, are temporary instruments that make space for braces and bands that your dentist plans to install.

To brush your teeth with spacers, you can brush as you normally would, with one crucial exception. Brush your teeth in a back-and-forth movement, instead of up-and-down strokes. This will help keep the spacers in place.

Check after brushing to make sure that all the spacers are still where your dentist placed them.

How to brush your teeth after wisdom teeth removal

After a tooth extraction, such as wisdom tooth removal, there are a few extra precautions to take when brushing:

  1. Start with your toothbrush lubricated with cool, clean water. Don’t use any toothpaste in the first few days following tooth removal.
  2. Brush carefully as you normally would. Don’t brush over the site where your tooth was removed. Do your best to avoid dislodging the blood clot and stitches at the site of your extraction.
  3. Don’t rinse at all until the day after surgery to avoid dislodging the blood clot. After the first day, rinse gently and carefully with water.
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How to brush your children’s teeth

Remember that children under the age of 3 may need to use fluoride-free toothpaste or a much smaller amount of fluoride toothpaste than an older child or adult.

A baby’s teeth can start to decay from when they emerge from the gum line, so be proactive about teaching them good dental habits.

  1. Use a soft, child-sized toothbrush, water, and a small smear of toothpaste the size of a rice grain (if under 3) or pea-sized (if above 3).
  2. Slowly brush the backs, fronts, and sides of your child’s teeth. Also brush the gums where teeth have not yet popped out.
  3. Make sure to brush your child’s tongue. Have them practice rinsing their mouth and spitting out their toothpaste.
How to brush your teeth without toothpaste

There are several alternatives to toothpaste that have become popular products in recent years. Some work better than others.

Whether you get stuck traveling and forget to bring your toothpaste, or if you just want to give more holistic teeth cleaning options a try, these are ingredients to consider.

Coconut oil

Coconut oil has antibacterial properties, which means it attacks the bacteria buildup in your mouth. It can also dissolve plaque, which makes it a decent alternative to toothpaste. It even fights tooth decay and gum disease.

While you should still use fluoride in your toothpaste, using coconut oil regularly has benefits of its own and can be used for “oil pulling” or brushing your teeth without much risk or drawbacks.

Activated charcoal

Most people don’t keep extra activated charcoal tablets laying around, so this option might not work if you’re just stranded in a hotel late at night without toothpaste (in which case, try calling the front desk instead). But pure activated charcoal and activated charcoal toothpaste products may be effective at cleaning your teeth.

But activated charcoal is abrasive and can wear down your enamel, which means it’s not an alternative to use regularly.

It also lacks fluoride, so your teeth might be more susceptible to decay if you switch your fluoride toothpaste for this option.

Baking soda

Many commercial toothpastes add baking soda to their formula to give it extra whitening power. Baking soda does work to help lift stains off your teeth. It’s also effective at removing plaque.

A baking soda paste is a great option if you’re in a pinch and have run out of toothpaste for the night.

Baking soda lacks fluoride, so over time you’re missing out on the enamel-protection benefits of that ingredient.

Takeaway

The process of brushing your teeth may look a little different in different times of your life. But what’s certain is that there’s no circumstance where you should avoid or skip brushing your teeth.

Brushing twice a day for at least 2 minutes each time is the foundation of good dental health and a smile that will last a lifetime.

w to Brush Your Teeth Properly

Brushing your teeth every day isn’t just a way to keep your mouth feeling clean. It’s a way to keep your whole body healthy, too.

The American Dental Association recommends brushing twice per day, for 2 minutes each time.

When you brush correctly, you eliminate the plaque buildup and bacteria that can otherwise collect between your teeth and on your tongue. This can prevent gum disease and tooth decay, as well as promote a stronger immune system and a healthier lifestyle.

We cover the ins and outs of brushing correctly, no matter your circumstance.

What you need to brush your teeth

The first step to brushing correctly is making sure you’re prepared with the right tools. You’ll need:

Your toothbrush should be replaced every 3 to 4 months. If your toothbrush has been overused, the bristles can become frayed and brushing loses some of its efficacy.

fluoride toothpaste that’s approved by the American Dental Association is the best choice for most adults.

Fluoride fortifies your teeth against decay. Some very young children shouldn’t use fluoride toothpaste. However, the ADA still recommends that:

  • children younger than age 3 whose first teeth have come in can use a smear of fluoride toothpaste about the size of a rice grain
  • children 3 to 6 can start using a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste

Special fluoride-free toothpastes also exist for younger kids if you’re worried about them swallowing the toothpaste.

How to brush your teeth properly, step by step
how to brush your teeth, teeth, brush teethShare on Pinterest
Brushing your teeth should take about 2 minutes.

The simplest way to brush your teeth involves your standard plastic-handled, nylon-bristled toothbrush.

The entire process should take about 2 minutes. Practice timing yourself until you get used to how long 2 minutes feels when you’re brushing.

  1. Lubricate your brush with a small amount of water. Put a small amount of toothpaste — about the size of a pea — on the head of the toothbrush.
  2. Insert the toothbrush into your mouth at about a 45-degree angle to your gums and use gentle, short strokes to brush your front teeth.
  3. Brush the outside surfaces of your teeth, making sure to get the back molars and upper areas of your chewing surfaces.
  4. Flip the toothbrush upside down to get the inside surface of your top front teeth. Flip it back around to get the inside surface of your bottom front teeth.
  5. Brush your tongue to get rid of any bacteria buildup or plaque that has gotten stuck there during the brushing process.
  6. Spit out the remnants of toothpaste, saliva, and water into a clean sink. Finish by rinsing your mouth with cold water.
How to brush your teeth with an electric toothbrush

Brushing your teeth with an electronic toothbrush head is slightly different since the brush head rotates or vibrates on its own.

  1. Prepare your toothbrush by rinsing it with a little bit of water. Add a pea-sized amount of toothpaste on top.
  2. Turn on your electric toothbrush and start at the back bottom row of your teeth, holding the head at a 45-degree angle toward the gum line.
  3. Applying light pressure, move methodically, one tooth at a time, buffing each tooth with the rotating vibrating brush head.
  4. Switch to the back top row of your teeth and repeat, cleaning and polishing one tooth at a time.
  5. Use the electronic brush head to stimulate and clean your tongue, moving it slowly across your tongue’s surface.
  6. Spit out the remnants of toothpaste, saliva, and water into a clean sink. Finish by rinsing your mouth with cold water.
How to brush your teeth with braces

Brushing your teeth with braces is pretty straightforward, but it does take a couple of extra steps.

  1. Start by removing any rubber bands or removable parts of your braces. These should be rinsed before reapplying them to your braces.
  2. Get your toothbrush ready with a little bit of water and a pea-sized amount of toothpaste.
  3. Carefully clean around your braces, including under the wires and pins.
  4. Brush the actual wires of your braces so that they’re free of any food particles that could cause plaque or bacteria buildup.
  5. Brush your teeth as you normally would, moving from one side of your mouth to the other and spending at least 2 minutes on brushing.
  6. Gently brush your tongue.
  7. Spit out any remaining toothpaste and saliva. Rinse your mouth with water and check the mirror to make sure your braces have been fully cleaned.
How to brush your teeth with spacers

Spacers, also called separators, are temporary instruments that make space for braces and bands that your dentist plans to install.

To brush your teeth with spacers, you can brush as you normally would, with one crucial exception. Brush your teeth in a back-and-forth movement, instead of up-and-down strokes. This will help keep the spacers in place.

Check after brushing to make sure that all the spacers are still where your dentist placed them.

How to brush your teeth after wisdom teeth removal

After a tooth extraction, such as wisdom tooth removal, there are a few extra precautions to take when brushing:

  1. Start with your toothbrush lubricated with cool, clean water. Don’t use any toothpaste in the first few days following tooth removal.
  2. Brush carefully as you normally would. Don’t brush over the site where your tooth was removed. Do your best to avoid dislodging the blood clot and stitches at the site of your extraction.
  3. Don’t rinse at all until the day after surgery to avoid dislodging the blood clot. After the first day, rinse gently and carefully with water.
ADVERTISEMENT
JustAnswer
Get Answers from a Doctor in Minutes, Anytime

Have medical questions? Connect with a board-certified, experienced doctor online or by phone. Pediatricians and other specialists available 24/7.

How to brush your children’s teeth

Remember that children under the age of 3 may need to use fluoride-free toothpaste or a much smaller amount of fluoride toothpaste than an older child or adult.

A baby’s teeth can start to decay from when they emerge from the gum line, so be proactive about teaching them good dental habits.

  1. Use a soft, child-sized toothbrush, water, and a small smear of toothpaste the size of a rice grain (if under 3) or pea-sized (if above 3).
  2. Slowly brush the backs, fronts, and sides of your child’s teeth. Also brush the gums where teeth have not yet popped out.
  3. Make sure to brush your child’s tongue. Have them practice rinsing their mouth and spitting out their toothpaste.
How to brush your teeth without toothpaste

There are several alternatives to toothpaste that have become popular products in recent years. Some work better than others.

Whether you get stuck traveling and forget to bring your toothpaste, or if you just want to give more holistic teeth cleaning options a try, these are ingredients to consider.

Coconut oil

Coconut oil has antibacterial properties, which means it attacks the bacteria buildup in your mouth. It can also dissolve plaque, which makes it a decent alternative to toothpaste. It even fights tooth decay and gum disease.

While you should still use fluoride in your toothpaste, using coconut oil regularly has benefits of its own and can be used for “oil pulling” or brushing your teeth without much risk or drawbacks.

Activated charcoal

Most people don’t keep extra activated charcoal tablets laying around, so this option might not work if you’re just stranded in a hotel late at night without toothpaste (in which case, try calling the front desk instead). But pure activated charcoal and activated charcoal toothpaste products may be effective at cleaning your teeth.

But activated charcoal is abrasive and can wear down your enamel, which means it’s not an alternative to use regularly.

It also lacks fluoride, so your teeth might be more susceptible to decay if you switch your fluoride toothpaste for this option.

Baking soda

Many commercial toothpastes add baking soda to their formula to give it extra whitening power. Baking soda does work to help lift stains off your teeth. It’s also effective at removing plaque.

A baking soda paste is a great option if you’re in a pinch and have run out of toothpaste for the night.

Baking soda lacks fluoride, so over time you’re missing out on the enamel-protection benefits of that ingredient.

Takeaway

The process of brushing your teeth may look a little different in different times of your life. But what’s certain is that there’s no circumstance where you should avoid or skip brushing your teeth.

Brushing twice a day for at least 2 minutes each time is the foundation of good dental health and a smile that will last a lifetime.

There are a couple of different types of electric toothbrushes. One type uses vibration, the other uses rotation-oscillation. It is believed that the rotation-oscillation type is more effective at reducing plaque. In addition, some electric toothbrushes generate an ultrasonic wave to clean the teeth. There are also numerous styles of brush heads, designed for deep cleaning, for sensitive teeth and gums, for patients with orthodontic braces, and so on.

Low-abrasive, gel toothpaste

With all that extra power and polishing, the type of toothpaste you choose becomes extra important. If the toothpaste is too abrasive, it can erode tooth enamel. Most electronic toothbrush manufacturers recommend a gel-type toothpaste for use with their equipment.

Happily, PerioSciences toothpastes are gel formulas, ideal for use with electric toothbrushes. PerioSciences presently offers antioxidant toothpaste in two different formulas—WHITE CARE and NATURAL. (And watch for new formulas coming soon.)

Extend whitening treatments

AO ProToothpaste WHITE CARE is designed to enhance whitening treatments, including professional bleaching treatments or at-home whitening strips. The toothpaste boosts and extends the whitening effects and supplies maximum strength fluoride to fight cavities. AO ProToothpaste is part of a complete WHITE CARE System that also includes AO ProRinse and AO ProVantage dental gel. In addition to maximizing whiteness, the WHITE CARE System soothes oral tissues following teeth-whitening procedures and supplies antioxidants to help maintain normal, healthy pH balance and counteract the harsh chemicals of teeth whitening.

All natural

AO ProToothpaste NATURAL is also infused with antioxidants in a gentle but powerful gel formula. Along with AO ProRinse NATURAL and AO ProVantage, the toothpaste is also a part of the complete NATURAL System. All the products in the NATURAL system are free of alcohol, fluoride, sodium lauryl sulfate, parabens, and artificial sweeteners. Environmentally friendly and naturally healthy, the powerful antioxidants counteract toxins that cause free-radical damage in soft oral tissues.

Both the NATURAL and the WHITE CARE formulations of AO ProToothpaste include hydroxyapatite, or crystalline calcium phosphate, which is the mineral that forms the structure of teeth. Dental scientists are recognizing hydroxyapatite as a means of remineralizing teeth and combatting cavities.

So if you’re switching to an electric toothbrush, be sure to check with your dentist about the best style of brush head and the proper technique.

And since you’re committed to the best possible oral hygiene, be sure to order PerioSciences AO ProToothpaste, AO ProRinse and AO ProVantage in either the WHITE CARE or NATURAL System.

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