drone camera price

Whether you’re using them for recreation, to build an aerial service business, or to integrate UAS into your existing business or organization, the goal of this article is to explore the best drone camera price ranges on the market today and mini drone price in nigeria.

Best Drones 2020 | Drone Reviews

drone camera price

Best drone: DJI Mavic 2 Zoom
(Image credit: DJI)

01. DJI Mavic 2 Zoom

The all-round best drone for photography

Weight: 905g | Dimensions (folded): 214×91×84mm | Dimensions (unfolded): 322×242×84mm | Controller: Yes | Video resolution: 4K HDR 30fps | Camera resolution: 12MP | Battery life: 31 minutes (3850mAh) | Max Range: 8km / 5mi | Max Speed: 72kph / 44.7mph

US$1,199VIEW AT AMAZON

US$1,199View at Amazon

US$1,299View at AmazonSee all prices (9 found)Very portableOptical Zoom (on the Zoom model)Great software featuresExpensiveNo 60fps for 4K

DJI’s Mavic Pro changed what was possible with the best camera drones back in 2016, making it possible to fold and carry a decent-quality lens without being overly heavy or bulky. It could capture 4K (at a maximum of 24fps) and introduced a handy fold-out controller that seemed to have more in common with a PlayStation than bulky radio controllers from their hobby era.

By 2020 the folding Mavic series is split into four. From cheapest to most expensive that’s the Mavic Mini, Mavic Air 2, Mavic 2  Zoom & Mavic 2 Pro. The final two have identical airframes but radically different camera units. The Zoom is our favorite because it features a 2x optical zoom lens (with an effective focal length range of 24-48mm). This gives real creative options in terms of  lens compression. This is highlighted by the drone’s unique feature, the Dolly Zoom quickshot, in which the aircraft simulates the Hitchcock classic camera move.

There is a price to pay though; the zoom sits infront of a 1/2.3” 12-megapixel camera which tops out at 3,200 ISO. Even at launch this was a little disappointing, though 4K video at up to 30fps and 100mbps are great quality, and DJI’s app provides a great balance of functionality and power. The only real complaint about the Mavic 2 is the lack of 60fps at 4K, and the fact the side sensors don’t really do much except give a false sense of security.

best drone: Autel EVO II
(Image credit: Autel Robotics)

02. Autel EVO II

With 8K video, this might be more than you need!

Weight: 1174g | Wing span (unfolded): 397×397mm | Controller: Yes | Video resolution: 8K @ 25fps | Camera resolution: 48MP | Battery life: 40 minutes | Max Range: 9km / 5.5mi | Max Speed: 72kph / 44mphPrimeUS$1,495VIEW AT AMAZONUS$1,789.99View at AmazonUS$1,949View at AmazonSee all prices (4 found)8K video quality48 megapixel cameraOmnidirectional sensors8K shooting is limited to 25fps

Like the Mavic 2, Autel’s second EVO is offered with different camera choices, in theory at least (supply has been erratic in its early months, but then 2020 hasn’t been an easy year). Both are built around a heavy, rugged-looking (but average feeling) orange airframe which eschews sleek consumer-friendly design for simple practicality. It’s a bit chunkier than the Mavics, but it can fly for longer and is bigger unfolded).

While Autel Explorer, it’s partner app, lacks some of the polish of DJI’s equivalents, it does bring all the tracking options you might want. Moreover it has the huge advantage of being optional: there is a 3.3-inch OLED screen in the remote meaning you can fly without connecting the phone at all. Another big plus is that the drone has omnidirectional collision sensors which it uses in normal fight (the Mavic 2 has side-sensors, but only uses them in some automatic modes). Intended for professional work, the drone also lacks DJI’s big-brother geofencing.

So far the ‘lesser’ 8K model is the one widely available – with the 6K ‘Pro’ model following and the dual infrared-enabled version to come. Why is 8K ‘lesser’? In fact it uses the same Sony IMX586 half-inch imaging chip as featured in the Mavic Air 2, while the 6K pro sports IMX383 1-inch sensor (that’s four times the area) and can output 10-bit footage and a variable aperture. It’s also worth noting that 8K is limited to 25fps; 6K to 50fps and 4K to 60fps. 

best drone: DJI Mavic 2 Pro
(Image credit: DJI)

03. DJI Mavic 2 Pro

A brilliant camera in a quality package

Weight: 907g | Dimensions (folded): 214×91×84mm | Dimensions (unfolded): 322×242×84mm | Controller: Yes | Video resolution: 4K HDR 30fps | Camera resolution: 20MP | Battery life: 31 minutes (3850mAh) | Max Range: 8km / 5mi | Max Speed: 72kph / 44.7mphPrimeUS$1,329VIEW AT AMAZONPrimeUS$1,649View at AmazonUS$1,729View at DellSee all prices (11 found)1-inch sensorReliable airframeGreat software featuresExpensiveNo 60fps for 4K

2020 saw the arrival of the Mavic Air 2 with a host of improvements to the Mavic line which make the Mavic 2 Pro more of a speciality aircraft than before, but whichever way you look at it the stills and, in lower light, the video remain unbeaten (without spending a good amount more and throwing portability out of the window).

Given DJI’s ownership of Hasselblad the camera branding might be seen as a gimmick, the 20 megapixel stills from the 1-inch sensor are unquestionably far better quality than those from smaller sensors (including the Mavic 2 Zoom). Manual controls allow up to 128,000 ISO to be selected and video can be output in real 10-bit (great for pro colour grading) and in HDR, and there is a ƒ/2.8-ƒ/11 aperture 

Each pixel on the sensor is still bigger than on all but the EVO II Pro from this list, so low-light stills and video look gorgeous, and the higher detail is also useful for surveyors and 3D mapping, both of which the Mavic handles easily thanks to integration with Drone Deploy (in fairness similar integration is available with other drones). The range of automated flight modes in the DJI drones, like ‘Hyperlapse’ (timelapse) are all well-implemented and easy to learn, making the Mavics very effective creative tools when operated alone.

(Image credit: Powervision)

04. PowerVision PowerEgg X Wizard

Best waterproof drone and best A.I. camera drone

Weight: 860g / 1.9lb | Dimensions (egg): 178 x 102 x 102mm | Dimensions (drone mode): 427mm diagonal | Controller: Yes | Video resolution: 4K @ 60fps | Camera resolution: 12MP | Battery life: 30 minutes (dry mode) | Max Range: 6 km / 3.7mi | Max Speed: 65kph / 40mph

US$1,249VIEW AT AMAZONSee all prices (2 found)Waterproof & water landing modeAudio-sync recording optionCamcorder mode a nice option to haveNo record button in camcorder modeSmall image sensor

PowerVision is certainly an inventive company – as its awards shelf will testament – and it has been making underwater drones as long as flying ones, so the PowerEgg X shouldn’t have come as a surprise, but it did. Their original PowerEgg was a stunning product, yet rather than revising it, PowerVision opted to go back to the drawing board. They created an altogether new egg which could be used as a drone, a hand-held or tripod-mounted camcorder making use of the gimbal for stability and A.I. for subject tracking, and – in the optional ‘Wizard’ kit – a beach-ready drone which can land on water or fly in the rain.

Photographers will rightly worry that the 4K camera doesn’t have as bigger sensor as, for example, the Mavic, but in good light it’s capable of 60fps – double the frame-rate of the DJI, making it great for. It’s adaptability means it’s arms are completely removable but, thanks to the folding props, setup takes no longer than a DJI Phantom. The A.I. camera mode is good, but it would really benefit from a ‘record’ button like a traditional camcorder – you need to use the app. 

The waterproof mode means attaching a housing and landing gear which does take a minute or two, and covers the forward-facing collision & object tracking sensors, but there is nothing on the market that can touch it so it’s hardly something to complain about. This is the drone that GoPro should have made.

Best camera drone - DJI Mavic Mini
(Image credit: DJI)

05. DJI Mavic Mini

The best drone for the beginner

Weight: 249g | Dimensions (folded): 140×82×57mm | Controller: Yes | Video resolution: 2.7K at 24 or 30fps | Camera resolution: 12MP | Battery life: 30 minutes (2400mAh) | Max Range: 4km / 2.5 miles | Max Speed: 47kph / 29mphUS$399VIEW AT DELLUS$469View at AmazonUS$549View at AmazonSee all prices (17 found)Very portableRegistration-free in USA, UK, Canada, China and moreEasy-to-flyManual controlsNo 4K video

With the original Mavic in 2016, DJI created a new category of folding prosumer drone, small and light enough to take nearly anywhere but with a good camera. Back then the limit was technology; now a new artificial dividing line has been added by regulation. Most of the major markets for drones – China, USA, UK and more – now require the registration (for a modest fee) of any drone weighing more than 250g (8.8oz). A simple web visit will secure you approval to fly a larger aircraft, but those new to drones, or looking to try the experience with minimal fuss, are understandably reluctant.

Unwilling to see their market stop growing, DJI’s R&D team have performed miracles to shave as much weight as possible from their existing designs, and have managed to trim the price at the same time. The key sacrifice has been video quality – the Mavic Mini can “only” capture at 2.7k (about half the number of pixels as 4K) and at 40Mbps, so the video has slightly more compression artifacts than that from a Mavic 2 Zoom, for example. It has also dispensed with the collision sensing systems on its bigger brothers. These sacrifices mean lighter computing components on board, as well as the benefits from the overall miniaturization. The latest firmware update enables manual exposure on the Mavic Mini.

The drone nonetheless has a 3-axis camera stabilization gimbal, meaning footage looks super-smooth, and DJI’s usual software has received a tidy-up to make it more vlogger/instagrammer friendly, so this can easily become your compact ‘FlyCam’ (as DJI’s marketing team are desperate for you to call it). It features ‘QuickShots’ – pre-programmed selfie-friendly clips – so you can get amazing shots without too great a learning curve. The resolution isn’t an issue for online sharing, though professionals will want to look a little further up the chain for their work (but will still want one of these in their bag when they’re traveling). At 12 megapixels, stills are broadly similar to a decent phone (but of course from rather more interesting angles!).

Best camera drone: Parrot Anafi
(Image credit: Parrot)

06. Parrot Anafi FPV

The foldable Anafi is the best drone for travel

Weight: 310g | Dimensions (folded): 244×67×65mm | Dimensions (unfolded): 240×175×65mm | Controller: Yes | Video resolution: 4K HDR 30fps | Camera resolution: 21MP | Battery life: 25 minutes (2700mAh) | Max Range: 4km / 2.5mi | Max Speed: 55kph / 35mphNo price informationCHECK AMAZONSee all prices (1 found)Very portable4K @ 100Mbps with HDR180° vertical-turn gimbal and zoomOnly 2-axis controlSome features are in-app purchases

Parrot wasn’t really a contender in the high-end aerial video market until the Anafi arrived in mid-2018, but it was definitely worth the wait. Rather than push up prices and weight with sensors of questionable use (and the processing power to handle their data), Parrot leave the business of avoiding obstacles very much to the customer. In exchange, though, it’s managed to keep the portability and price manageable, helped by the fact a great hard-fabric zip case is included so you’ll be able to shoot just about anywhere.

The carbon-fiber elements of the body can feel a little cheap, but in reality this is one of the best built frames on the market, and very easy to operate thanks to automatic take-off, landing, GPS-based return-to-home, and an exceptionally well-built folding controller with a hinged phone-grip, one that seems so much easier to operate, and so much more logical, than recent contenders from DJI. 

The only niggles are that the gimbal is only powered on two axes, relying on software to handle sharp turns, which it only does quite well, and that for some reason Parrot charge extra for in-app features like follow-me modes that DJI include as standard. On the plus side, that gimbal can be turned all the way up for an unobstructed angle most drones can’t manage and the system even features zoom, unheard of at its price point.

A new Parrot Anafi FPV kit has been recently introduced, which combines this drone with head-up display (‘first-person view’) goggles for a fully immersive flying experience. While the addition of FPV might seem a novelty at first, the economical implementation means that anyone considering an Anafi can afford to sample it –  and we genuinely believe it would be a shame to miss! 

Best camera drones - DJI Mavic Air 2
(Image credit: DJI)

07. DJI Mavic Air 2

If it’s a foldable drone you want in 2020, this is the best

Weight: 570g | Dimensions (folded): 180×97×84mm | Dimensions (unfolded): 183×253×77mm | Controller: Yes | Video resolution: 4K 60fps | Camera resolution: 48MP | Battery life: 34 minutes (3500mAh) | Max Range: 18.5km / 11.4mi | Max Speed: 68kph / 42mph

US$799VIEW AT AMAZONSee all prices (2 found)Portable4K shooting a 60fpsObject avoidance with course correctionNo side or top sensorsApp could be better

The new DJI Mavic Air 2 is a stunning technical achievement, an incredibly capable drone that – for most people – might look like the only flying camera they’d ever need. With front, downward and rear-facing distance sensors, the drone is capable of identifying obstacles and not just warning the pilot, but also plotting a course to avoid, say, a wall or a tree if needed.

This drone offers much longer flying time (an impressive 34 minutes) and better range than the original Mavic Air. But the real appeal to photographers and videographers is the new 4K 60fps camera, which packs a 48 megapixel half-inch sensor.

This drone gets a completely redesigned controller, which we rather like – with your smartphone slotting in above the controllers, just like you would find on top-end drones.

As with other DJI drones an extra “fly more” pack is available which bundles stuff you really need (case, spare batteries) – this costs more, of course, but is often a wise investment.

NOTE The older Mavic Air can still be found on sale, and is now found at reduced prices. However, we think the Mavic Air 2 is still the best buy of the two.

Best camera drone: DJI Phantom Pro V2.0
(Image credit: DJI)

08. DJI Phantom 4 Pro V2.0

This is the best drone for serious photographers and filmmakers

Weight: 1375g | Dimensions: 350x350xmm | Controller: Yes | Video resolution: 4K @ 60fps | Camera resolution: 20MP | Battery life: 25 minutes (5870mAh) | Max Range: 7km / 4.1mi | Max Speed: 72kph / 44.7mphPrimeUS$2,049VIEW AT AMAZONUS$4,631View at AmazonSee all prices (3 found)Large image sensorDesign classicSubject trackingSize feels a little clunky

The Phantom was a revolutionary product, its earlier versions including the first drone to feature a gimbal-stabilized camera rather than requiring the user to supply their own. Its rugged body design means that while it’s no longer the obvious choice for beginners or consumers (for whom folding products offer at least the same practicality), there is a strong use-case for an occasional professional.

If you’re going to be putting the drone in the back of your car, and don’t mind it taking up most of a specialist rucksack (rather than just a side pocket like the Mavic Air), then the Phantom Pro 4’s latest update is very tempting. Redesigned props for quieter flight are definitely pleasing, and the new OcuSync radio system that makes 1080p video possible on the monitors is a plus (though it won’t work with the older controllers).

There were concerns that this drone was going to be discontinued, but DJI have now confirmed that the Phantom 4 Pro V2.0 is now back in production. That’s great news for any drone pilot that has truly professional photographic ambitions.

Best camera drone: DJI Inspire 2
(Image credit: DJI)

09. DJI Inspire 2

The camera drone to buy when the optics are your priority

Weight: 4000g | Dimensions: 605 diagonal mm | Controller: Yes | Video resolution: 5.2k @ 24fps | Camera resolution: 20.8MP | Battery life: 23-27 minutes (4280mAh dual battery) | Max Range: 7km / 4.1mi | Max Speed: 94kph / 58mphPrimeUS$2,899VIEW AT AMAZONPrimeUS$3,299View at AmazonUS$4,399View at AmazonSee all prices (9 found)Interchangeable lens system availableSolid build quality & backup systemsCapable of live 1080i broadcastHigh purchase costDual battery makes getting spares expensiveProps need to be locked into place

The Inspire 1 brought with it a jaw-dropping Klingon-inspired design that keeps the props comfortably out of most shots while allowing for a big, stable frame. The Inspire 2 cements that professional quality with a magnesium hull (careful where you grip it) and lots of dual redundancy for safer flight.

One of those duplicated parts is the battery; you need both to fly and they buy you about 25 minutes of power depending on the camera you choose. That’s great, but a spare pair of batteries is an eye-watering $360/£360, and the X4S camera is comparable to the Phantom. The X5S (to which you can attach a zoom lens from a Micro 4/3rds camera) is rather better with its big image sensor, but flight times come down, making the phenomenally expensive Zenmuse X7 more appealing.

The Inspire 2 also has sophisticated object tracking, (optional) multi-user operation and other pro features and isn’t really for casual use. It only lacks redundancy on the motors (six would be safer).

Best camera drone: Ryze Tello

10. Ryze Tello

A great drone that proves size isn’t everything!

Weight: 80g | Dimensions: 98x93x41 diagonal mm | Controller: No | Video resolution: 720p | Camera resolution: 5MP | Battery life: 13 minutes (1100mAh) | Max Range: 100m | Max Speed: 29kph / 18mph

US$99VIEW AT AMAZONUS$99View at Dell

US$109View at AmazonSee all prices (6 found)Bargain price for the featuresBrilliant indoorsGreat way to start learning codingRelying on phone to record captures interference tooRange rarely reaches 100mCan’t tilt camera

This microdrone – well below the minimum weight for registration in many countries – proudly proclaims that it’s “powered by DJI.” To back that up, it has a great array of software features and positioning sensors. With surprisingly good image quality and straight-to-phone saving it could give your Instagram channel a new perspective.

The price has been kept down; there is no GPS, you have to charge the battery inside the drone via USB, and you fly with your phone (a charging station and add-on game controllers can be used – Ryze offers its own). Images are recorded directly to your phone, not a memory card. The camera is stabilized in software only, but the 720p video looks good given that handicap.

If you want to look cool flying, you can launch it from your hand, or even throw it into flight. Other modes let you record 360-degree videos, and the software includes some clever swipe-directed flips. Geekier pilots can even program it.

Best camera drone: PowerVision PowerEye
(Image credit: Powervision)

PowerVision PowerEye

A monster camera drone that takes interchangeable cameras…

Weight: 3950g | Dimensions (folded): 340×285×296mm | Dimensions (unfolded): 513×513×310mm | Controller: Yes | Video resolution: 4K @ 30fps | Camera resolution: 16.1MP | Battery life: 29 minutes (9000mAh) | Max Range: 5km / 3.1mi | Max Speed: 65kph / 40mph

US$2,616.32VIEW AT AMAZONSee all prices (2 found)Cheaper way of interchangeable zoom lenses3-year 24-hour no-question guaranteeHigh-quality case bundledSoftware a little lackingControl perhaps a little too soft

The PowerEye is a great example of the benefits to consumers of being in a market dominated by one brand (DJI, in case you were in any doubt). It really makes new contenders look for ways to impress, and by carrying a Micro Four Thirds camera this drone is firmly putting itself against the Inspire 2 with a Zenmuse X5S.

It makes it case well; there’s no showy 8k mode but the 4k is good, the two batteries supplied each split into two for shipping (so it’s not too big for carry-on rules), and the manually folding down arms allow for a surprisingly compact traveling position in the (included) travel case.

I was only able to test the drone on a very gusty day, and the system struggled to hold position at first, but it won out. The control app and remote are less complex than DJI’s, so there are fewer software features, but the FPV camera is of a high standard and dual-pilot flight is there for pros. 

Types of Drones

Beginner Drones

At the lower end of the drone spectrum are toy drones, like the Parrot Mambo and the Hobbico Dromidia Kodo. These simple and inexpensive drones come in at about $100 and are more focused on fun than features. Their controls are straightforward and easy to learn, and they can be accessed through a smartphone app or included remote control.

The flight times of beginner drones and drones for kids are also more limited – generally less than 10 minutes, or even fewer than five for the very cheap models. Designed to perform some tricks, like midair flips, spare parts are available at fairly low prices if anything goes awry. Some small drones also come with video cameras, though the quality captured tends to be poor. But don’t count them out too soon – getting a cheap drone is a fantastic way to learn to fly before upgrading to a more expensive model. They also won’t cost a fortune to fix or replace in the event of a crash.

Camera Drones

Drones with cameras – like the DJI Mavic Mini, the Parrot Bebop 2, and the GDU Byrd – are specifically designed to capture images, and range in price from $500 to $1,500. Built to provide a steady platform for the lens, which can either be an add-on or built-in, these sophisticated flying machines are more focused on recording high-quality video and still images than performing midair tricks. Because the equipment needed makes them larger and heavier, video drones need to be registered with the FAA.

Video drones often come with gimbals, which is a system designed to pan and tilt the camera – and cushion it from the motors’ vibrations – to cancel out the drone’s motion and keep the lens steady. Gimbals can either come as an electronic system built into the camera, as seen in the Parrot Bebop 2, or as a physical system made of motors and gears, like in the Mavic Air. Either way, the gimbals allow users to direct the camera at whatever angle they like, to capture beautiful pans like those seen in nature documentaries.

Bigger drones need bigger batteries, which often translates to longer flight times. A fully charged battery typically lasts a video drone around 20 minutes, and they can usually be swapped for spares to extend the session. Like toy drones, video drones are also built to be repaired, and replacement parts are generally easily available. Parts are relatively inexpensive as well, with Mavic Air’s replacement rotor blades running about $20. The quality of video these drones capture can vary widely, from the Bebop 2’s decent but sometimes choppy HD video to the Mavic Air’s super-smooth panning shots. While the videos produced by cheaper models like the Bebop 2 will be good enough for most use cases, it’s worth investing in the more sophisticated DJI drones when quality’s the main focus.

From photographing special occasions to surveying construction sites, drones are being used for an ever-expanding range of purposes. In fact, dedicated drone film festivals have popped up in major cities like New York and Berlin to showcase the creative new ways amateur moviemakers are utilizing their flying machines. Not only that, but the more innovative drones – like the Mavic Air – have built-in autonomous flight tech to make journeys on their own. They can even use cameras to detect and avoid obstacles in the way of their flight path. These more advanced drones allow users to play with their device’s autonomy by letting them navigate a predefined course on their own via GPS. Autonomous flight does, however, come with some restrictions – these drones must be registered with the FAA and have to be kept in the pilot’s line of sight at all times. The pilot must also be able to take back control of the drone at any point.

Racing Drones

With the rise of drones came the rise of drone-based competitions – and drone racing might just be the most exciting of all. Racing drones are on the smaller side and designed specifically to offer pilots speed and agility. Users see through their drone’s lens via first-person-view headsets, navigating around a course and trying to beat other fliers. Most racing drones are adapted by hand to shed unnecessary weight or increase motor power. Cheaper models, like the Aerix Black Talon 2.0, start at about $115. Ready-to-fly drones on the higher end of the spectrum, such as the Uvify Draco, can run up to $700.

Drone Safety

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) drone regulations are the guiding principle behind safe unmanned aircraft flight.

Drones can be an incredibly fun and fruitful new hobby, but they must be flown responsibly. Even a small toy drone can hurt someone if hit by it, and fingers can get injured if caught in the rotor blades. To fight this, some drones have built-in shields to protect the rotors, but even these aren’t foolproof. It’s best to fly any kind of drone, big or small, with proper care and caution. Here’s five quick tips for drone safety:

  • Know the drone. Before the first flight, take the time to read through the instruction manual and get familiar with the controls.
  • Check the drone before flight, looking for any damage to the motors or rotors that could fail in the air.
  • Never fly near people or animals.
  • Fly with caution, particularly when first using a drone or taking a new one for a spin. Always be sure to land before the drone’s battery runs outs.
  • Fly with care. Drones can be noisy, annoying and even scary to those near their flight path. If someone asks to stop flying, be reasonable and courteous.

To learn more about drone safety, the Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA) is a fantastic resource on all things drone. The AMA can help connect drone enthusiasts with others in the area to share both beginner’s flying techniques, and more advanced tips and tricks. Remote-control flying clubs often meet regularly to discuss and fly drones together. But remember that with great power comes great responsibility. Make sure to update all software and firmware before any takeoff, and read the drone’s manual thoroughly before use. For FAA registration requirements and further information on drone safety, check the FAA website. Additional local jurisdiction requirements may apply, so it’s important to stay informed on the latest drone regulations for the area.

Drones & The Law

Recently, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) introduced registration requirements for anyone flying a drone weighing over 250g recreationally. Most drones that fall under the toy category will not have to be registered, while those built for video, racing and autonomous flight likely do. Drone registration can be done via the FAA website – and separate, more stringent requirements are applied to professional drone fliers.

Once registered, the registration number must be displayed on the drone. This can be as simple as a sticker or shipping label placed under the battery, along with the owner’s name and number in case of theft or loss. The FAA also defines restrictions on where drones can be flown. They can’t be flown higher than 400 feet, in restricted airspaces, or over emergency areas, like traffic accidents or wildfires. They’re also banned from flying through national parks and cannot be flown within 5 miles of an airport without informing the air traffic controllers. Federal, state, and local regulations can vary, so check with the organizations directly if unsure.

Drone Accessories & Add-ons

Additional hardware can be added to drones that have ample lift from their propellers and motors. Lift specs can be found via the drone manufacturer’s website. In general, drones built to support external cameras are usually equipped to carry an additional half pound or more of weight above that of the drone on its own. Added weight increases stress on the motors and can affect flight time and stability.

The most popular and useful drone accessory is undoubtedly the spare battery. Drone batteries can provide between 5 and 25 minutes of power in the air per charge but can take an hour or longer to recharge. Fortunately, most drone batteries can simply be replaced with a freshly charged one when the power levels get low. To get the most airtime out of each flying session, users should invest in several spares.

The next most useful accessories for drones are spare propellers and parts. Because occasional mishaps and less-than-perfect landings are an inevitable part of flying drones, they were designed to survive crashes. The exterior components are made from sturdy materials – such as polypropylene foam and carbon fiber – that protect the more sensitive parts, like the CPUs, motors and transmitters. The parts that break the most easily, like the propellers, are the cheapest and easiest to repair or replace. New drones often have extra propellers included, and additional spares are usually available for purchase separately as well. Remember that drones need different propellers to spin clockwise and counterclockwise for stability, so it’s wise to get both kinds of spare propellers.

Depending on use cases, other drone add-ons that may be of interest include LED bands, propeller guards and extra landing gear. For photography drones in particular, various lens filters can be added to alter saturation levels, reduce glare, and more. Getting a quality bag or case specifically designed to carry a drone is an important investment as well. Drone bundles can often be found with a number of accessories. Drone cases should have a foam interior built to fit the device and its accessories and protect them from damage during transit.

Featured Products

Here are some featured Drone products.

1. Holy Stone HS700D FPV GPS Drone with 2K FHD Camera

Main Feature

GPS Assisted Flight

Camera Quality

2K FHD 90°Adjustable Camera

$699.99

$259.99BUY NOW

2. DJI Mavic Mini 

Main Feature

249g Ultralight + 30-min Max. Flight Time

Camera Quality

4 km HD Video Transmission

$499.00BUY NOW

3. Wingsland S6 (Outdoor Edition) Black Mini Pocket Drone 4K Camera

Main Feature

250g can be easily put into your pocket.

Camera Quality

4K 30P and 1080P 60P HD Video

$139.99BUY NOW

4. Hubsan H501A X4 Brushless WIFI Drone GPS and App Compatible

Main Feature

Waypoint function choice the best flight-route.

Camera Quality

Built-in 1080P HD camera

$152.00BUY NOW

Things to Consider When Buying a Drone

There is a multitude of options on the market now, with each model excelling in something else. Hence, before you go ahead and buy your drone, decide what are the most important things to consider when buying one.

Purpose

Drone to Learn Flying

When you just wanna try and see if it’s something for you, learn how to fly a drone and have some fun, it may be better to go for a cheap UAS. You can get one for as little as $30 and it will have all the functions you’ll need. It may lack in video quality, or it can get heavy, but you will be able to play with it without worrying as much about crashing. It’s a good idea to start with this and learn the ropes.

Here’s a list of best drones for under 200 dollars in 2020.

Drone for Hiking

You can capture some of the best videos of yourself and your friends, as well as the landscapes, when you go hiking with a quadcopter. The most important things to consider when you buy a drone for hiking are weight, flight time, camera resolution and camera stabilization. It’s also important to make sure it will fit into your drone backpack (yeah, that’s actually a thing now).

With this in mind, we created a list of the best drones for hiking in 2020.

Hiking Drone

Drone for Selfies

It’s no longer uncommon to see someone swapping a selfie stick for a selfie drone. From pocket drones that can take photos of you and your friends to machines that will follow your movement and react to voice commands/ hand gestures, there’s a whole genre of devices built to accommodate the need for us to capture each moment from another perspective.https://6a7216e4485e9de66bead7c4465a0d81.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

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We created a list of best selfie drones in 2020, and there’s even one that doubles as your phone cover so it’s always with you.

Drone Weight

Depending on how you want to use your drone, its weight is probably the most important factor to take into consideration. If you want to take it with you everywhere, heavy UAS will soon prove to be a burden. Lightweight, however, often lack the extra features and have shorter flight times. Hence it’s a trade off you’ll need to consider first.

Important! Many countries regulate the licensing and use of UAV based on their weight. Do consider your contry’s regulations before buying a drone. Many places around the world do not require licensing or registration to use drones under 250 grams.

Flight Time/ Batteries

How long you can fly your drone on each battery will determine how far you can go with it. When the first personal drones come out you had a minute or so to play with. Now there are drones that can fly for 30 minutes non-stop and then you can just swap a spare battery to continue.

Flight time of each battery charge is one of the most important things to check before making a purchase decision. Also, do not forget to see if the batteries can be easily replaced or even if the drone comes with spare ones.

Drone Parts
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Flight/ Control Range

How far you can fly without losing control can make a huge difference in the footage and fun you can get from your drone.

There are 3 main methods of communicating with your drone, which impact it’s control range:

  • Radio
    You’ll need a controller to send and receive the radio waves to and from your drone. Depending on the size of the antenna, the range can extend up to 5 miles.
  • Wi-Fi
    The maximum control range using Wi-Fi signals is about 650 yards (600 meters). It’s often much shorter so you’ll have to see the specs of each drone you consider. The good thing is that with some models you may not need a separate controller to fly your UAS.
  • GPS
    It’s also possible, with some models, to define a flight path that your drone will then follow using Global Positioning System (GPS).

Controller

With the things mentioned above in mind, there is a trade off between flight range and total weight of the equipment you have to carry with you. On one hand, it would be best if we could use your smartphone to fly the drone, so that you don’t have to carry an additional controller, but on the other hand the range would suffer without it.

If you just want the drone for selfies, then lack of controller would be fantastic, but if you want to go far into the sea to capture whales, then you want to be in control at all times and from afar. Consider this before you choose your quadcopter.

Drone Controller
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Camera Resolution

Most people use drones for videos, so you should check if your new drone would capture the world in low resolution, Standard Definition (SD), 720P High Definition (HD), 1080P Full HD (FHD), or 4K. Each one is at least twice better than the one before and something to consider.

It’s also very important to check if the footage is recorded to an SD card in the drone, or sent to your smartphone before getting recorded there. If it’s not built-in, whenever you lose connection, you lose that part of the recording. Whereas, with the on-board SD card you’ll have the full footage at your disposal after retrieving your drone, even if it lost the connection with the controller.

Camera Stabilization

Your drone, if it has any camera stabilization at all which you should check, will either stabilize the recording with software or mechanically.

The best for the job is a 3-axis gimbal. Thanks to which, your videos will be filmed with a steady, cinematic motion that compensates for the shakes and wind movements.

Alternatively, some models compensate for the shaky conditions with built-in software. Not as good as a gimbal but much better than nothing at all.

Drone And Smartphone
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First Person View (FPV)

Check if it’s possible to see through First Person View directly from your drone while flying. While you can control the AUV by looking at it directly, it would be better to sometimes see for yourself if everything you want to record stays within the frame.

Speed

The importance of your drone’s speed becomes crucial when you need to fly in a strong wind. It may not be able to return back to you if you’re standing upwind, and there are places where it would not be possible to retrieve your drone by walking up to it (imagine shooting at sea).

If you just want to use your drone for fun, then speed is important as it’s just more exciting to fly it faster.

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