how much does it cost to fuel a fighter jet

How Much Does It Cost To Fuel A Fighter Jet? How much fuel does a fighter jet use? We will answer these in our post below. Modern military fighter aircraft are extremely expensive to procure with the unit cost for a single F-35A coming to $98 million, according to Lockheed Martin . That program has already gone down as the most expensive weapons system in history and it’s set to cost $1.509 trillion through to 2070. The amount of money needed to keep America’s cutting-edge military aircraft airborne once they enter service is also considerable.

how much fuel does a fighter jet use?

How Much Does It Cost To Fuel A Fighter Jet?

FAIRFORD, ENGLAND - JULY 01: The first of Britain's new supersonic 'stealth' strike fighters... [+] accompanied by a United States Marine Corps F-35B aircraft, flies over the North Sea having taken off from RAF Fairford on July 1, 2016 in Gloucestershire, England. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

FAIRFORD, ENGLAND – JULY 01: The first of Britain’s new supersonic ‘stealth’ strike fighters… [+]

According to Department of Defense data, the Air Force's two newest fighters are extremely expensive to operate. The F-22A and the F-35A have an hourly operating cost of $33,538 and $28,455 respectively. That’s considerably more than the aircraft they’re set to replace, such as the A-10 which costs just under $6,000 every hour. Air Force attempts to retire the twin-engined attack aircraft have been met with fierce criticism after its success supporting soldiers and Marines on the ground in Afghanistan. The F-16, the workhorse of the Air Force, has hourly operating costs of around $8,000.

A US Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II attack aircraft manuoevers near a mountain during the joint US... [+] and Philippine troops live fire exercise on the last day of the joint military exercise at Crow Valley, in Capas town, Tarlac province north of Manila on April 30, 2015 (TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images).

A US Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II attack aircraft manuoevers near a mountain during the joint US… [+]

Across the Navy and Marine Corps, the cost of keeping aircraft operational is also relatively low in relation to the new 5th generation fighters coming into service. The hourly bill for keeping an AV-8B Harrier in the air comes to around $13,700 while a two-seat FA-18F costs somewhere in the region of $10,500. F-22As have been active bombing ISIS targets in Syria but with such massive hourly operating costs, shouldn’t other platforms be doing the same job at a fraction of the cost?

The Air Force has planes for every mission, but those planes aren’t always doing missions for the Air Force.

In October, the Defense Department comptroller released the latest reimbursement rates for each service branch’s planes and helicopters.

These costs are generally calculated based on fuel use, wear and tear, and personnel needs — the branch providing the aircraft also typically provides a pilot and crew, an Air Force spokeswoman told Business Insider.

The document lists four categories for reimbursement: other Defense Department components, other federal agencies, foreign-military sales, and “all other.”

“When determining the hourly rate, agencies should utilize the appropriate rate category,” the document said. “The ‘all other’ annual billable rate will be used to obtain reimbursement for services provided to organizations outside the Federal government.”

Below, you can see Air Force aircraft reimbursement rates for users that fall into the “all other” category — that’s you.

A-10C Thunderbolt — $6,454

U.S. Air Force Capt. Cody “ShIV” Wilton, A-10C Thunderbolt II Demonstration Team commander/pilot, taxis at Midland International Air and Space Port following a demonstration at Midland, Texas, Sept. 14, 2018
The A-10C. 

The A-10C Thunderbolt, also known as the Warthog, is the US Air Force’s premier ground-attack aircraft and perhaps the best in the world, renowned by foot soldiers for its ability to absorb punishment and dish out even more with its 30 mm cannon.

The Air Force has a total of 281 A-10s in its inventory. As of mid-2018, 173 of them had gotten or were in the process of getting new wings.

The future of the roughly 100 that still need wings has been the subject of debate between Air Force officials, many of whom want to retire the Thunderbolt and move on to other platforms, and members of Congress, who want to see the fearsome gunship continue flying.

AC-130J Ghostrider — $7,541

Air Force AC-130J Ghostrider gunship
The AC-130J Ghostrider. 

The AC-130J is the latest variant of the AC-130 gunship, upgraded with enhanced avionics, as well as integrated navigation systems, defensive systems, and radar. It is also modified with the Precision Strike Package, which has a mission-management system that puts sensors, communications, and order-of-battle and threat information into a common picture.

The Ghostrider — a name officially designated in May 2012 — is still relatively new, having completed developmental tests and evaluation in June 2015. As of 2016, the Air Force planned to have 32 Ghostriders in the active-duty force by fiscal year 2021.

The aircraft has struggled, particularly with its 30 mm and 105 mm guns. But the commander of the 1st Special Operations Wing said last year the gunship would probably be “the most requested weapons system from ground forces in the history of warfare.”

B-1B Lancer — $51,475

B 1B Lancer
A B-1B Lancer. 

Of Air Force aircraft, the B-1B Lancer packs the largest payload — 75,000 pounds — of both guided and unguided weapons and is the “backbone” of the US long-range-bomber force.

It has a ceiling of 30,000 feet, which isn’t the highest of the Air Force’s bombers, but it is the fastest, capable of topping 900 mph, or a little over the speed of sound at sea level.

In order to comply with the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, signed by the US and the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, the Lancer was modified to make it incapable of carrying nuclear weapons, a conversion process completed in 2011.

As of late 2016, the Air Force had 64 Lancers — two for testing — all of which were in the active force.

B-2A Spirit — $62,012

b-2 bomber
A B-2 Spirit. 

The B-2A stealth bomber arrived at the Air Force in 1993, six years after the first Lancer was delivered.

Unlike the Lancer, which is designed for high-speed, low-altitude strikes, the Spirit flies higher — up to 50,000 feet — and slower. It’s also capable of hauling nuclear weapons.

As of the end of 2015, there were 20 Spirits in the Air Force active-duty fleet, one of which was for testing. The only operational base for the B-2 is Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri, so add that flying time into your budget.

B-52H Stratofortress — $33,919

B-52
B-52 

Pricewise, the B-52 is a bargain compared with its bomber counterparts, but the Stratofortress is well over a half-century old, reaching initial operating capacity in spring 1952.

Flying at 650 mph and up to 50,000 feet with a payload of 70,000 pounds of both conventional and nuclear weapons, it can conduct strategic strikes, close air support, and maritime operations.

Its unfueled range is more than 8,800 miles. With aerial refueling, its range is limited only by its crew’s endurance.

At the end of 2015, there were 58 B-52s in use by the Air Force’s active-duty force and another 18 being used by the Air Force Reserve. They’re all H models and are assigned to the 5th Bomb Wing at North Dakota’s Minot Air Force Base and to the 2nd Bomb Wing at Barksdale Air Force Base in Louisiana.

C-130J Super Hercules — $6,651

Air Force C-130J Hercules Camp Lemonnier Djibouti
A C-130J Hercules. 

The C-130J is the latest addition to the C-130J family, replacing older C-130Es and some C-130Hs with more flying hours. 

Technology on the C-130J reduces manpower needs and operational and maintenance costs. The J model also climbs higher and faster and can fly farther with a higher cruising speed, in addition to taking off and landing in a shorter distance.

As of June 2018, the Air Force had 145 C-130Js in active duty, with anther 181 being used by the Air National Guard and 102 by the reserve component.

C-17A Globemaster III — $16,236

c17
A C-17 Globemaster III. 

The C-17 is the most flexible member of the Air Force airlift fleet, able to deliver troops and cargo to main operating hubs or to forward bases. 

“The C-17 was designed for multi-role functions,” Maj. Steve Hahn, an instructor pilot with the Air Force Reserve’s 301st Airlift Squadron, said in 2010. “Its strategic and tactical abilities join the missions of the C-5 (Galaxy) and C-130 (Hercules) into one aircraft. It does everything, and not many aircraft can do that.”

As of mid-2018, there were 157 C-17s in active service, 47 in use by the Air National Guard, and 18 being used by the Air Force reserve.

C-5M Super Galaxy — $25,742

C-5M Super Galaxy airlifter tanker
A C-5M Super Galaxy. 

The C-5M Super Galaxy — the modernized version of the legacy C-5 aircraft — is the largest aircraft in the Air Force inventory, tasked with transporting troops and cargo. 

It can carry oversize cargo, including 50-foot-long submarines, over intercontinental distances, and doors at the front and back allow for it to be loaded and offloaded at the same time.

Its maximum cargo is 281,000 pounds, and the longest distance it can fly without refueling is just over 5,500 miles — the distance from its base at Dover Air Force Base to the Incirlik air base in Turkey.

In August 2018, Lockheed Martin delivered the last of 52 upgraded C-5s, bringing 49 C-5Bs, two C-5Cs, and one C-5A up to the M variant and wrapping up a 17-year overhaul effort. The work extends the C-5 fleet’s service life into the 2040s.

E-4B — $73,123

Air Force E-4B
An E-4B. 

The E-4B is an expensive aircraft with an invaluable mission.

It serves as the National Airborne Operations Center, providing a highly survivable command, control and communications center where the president, defense secretary, and joint chiefs of staff can direct US forces, execute emergency war orders, and coordinate actions by civil authorities if ground command centers are destroyed.

The Air Force has four E-4Bs in its active force, and at least one is on 24-hour alert. In addition to an advanced satellite-communications system and an electrical system to support it, the E4-B is hardened against electromagnetic pulses, if that’s something you’re worried about.

F-15E Strike Eagle — $17,936

F15E bomb
An F-15E dropping a bomb. 

The F-15 is an all-weather, highly maneuverable tactical fighter designed to gain and maintain air superiority. It became operational in 1975 and has been the Air Force’s primary fighter jet and interceptor for decades.

The F-15E is two-seat integrated fighter for all-weather, air-to-air, and deep-interdiction missions. The Air Force has 219 F-15Es in total.

The first F-15E was delivered in 1989, about a decade after the F-15C, a single-seat fighter, and the F-15D, another two-seater. The latter two are also available, but they’ll cost you a little be more — $22,233 for the C model and $22,045 for the D model.

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