how to get rid of hair bumps on female chin

In this article, we will show you How To Get Rid Of Hair Bumps On Female Chin and how to stop facial hair growth in females naturally. First of all, know this—so many ladies experience the hairy issue. “Having stray facial hairs is very common for women,” says Arash Akhavan, MD, a New York City dermatologist with the Dermatology and Laser Group. “It’s not uncommon for women in their mid to upper 20s to begin noticing stray hairs on their face.” And usually, the number of hairs one finds tend to increase with age. “Due to hormonal changes, hair does increase with age,” says Dr. Akhavan. “Even after undergoing permanent hair removal procedures such as laser hair removal and electrolysis, one must remember that periodic touchup sessions will be needed since new hairs are always popping out.”

That’s because facial hair in women is frequently hormonally driven—which can stem from a number of conditions. “The top hormone for hair growth is testosterone,” says Suzie Welsh, hormone expert, CEO, and founder of Binto, a personalized supplement brand. “This is a sex hormone that’s naturally more predominant in men than women. When women have hormonal fluctuations, and more specifically, higher circulating testosterone levels, one of the side effects is unwanted hair growth—which is called hirsutism in the medical world.”

“Having stray facial hairs is very common for women.” —Arash Akhavan, MD

how to stop facial hair growth in females naturally

You could experience such fluctuations if you deal with PCOS, or polycystic ovarian syndrome, she explains. “This is one of the top reasons women have hormonal fluctuations and higher testosterone—women with PCOS have more male sex hormones, which results in facial hair growth,” says Welsh. Chin hair on women can also stem from hormonal imbalances. “These sorts of imbalance issues are often caused by some other adrenal disorder, which would be a complication or miscommunication of the glands that control your sex hormone feedback loop,” says Welsh. And lastly, it can happen, and often does, when women enter menopause.

how to get rid of hair bumps on female chin

How I got rid of my thick, stubborn facial hair permanently | Peach Clinics

There are many ways to furtively remove your chin hairs: tweezing, waxing, laser — even shaving. The Cut spoke to several dermatologists about why they have that pesky habit of showing up when you least expect it. 

1. New chin-hair growth can appear as mysteriously and suddenly as Solange’s wedding.
It can literally sprout overnight. Dr. Elizabeth Tanzi of the Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery explains that when you are younger, chin hair can grow as a result of a hormonal imbalance. When you are older, it’s due to a lack of estrogen. New York dermatologist Dr. Carlos Charles also cites genetics as a reason for chin hair. If your mom has chin hair, you most likely will, too.

2. Wax, thread, and depilate depending upon your skin’s sensitivity.
Here’s how it goes in terms of abrasiveness: Depilatory creams are less abrasive than threading, which is less abrasive than waxing. But, as Dr. Tanzi explains, with waxing, threading, and depilation, “if you have sensitive skin, you’ll be red and bumpy no matter what.” Threading rips out hair at the root, while waxing is highly irritating to sensitive skin as it also tugs at the surrounding skin. Depilatory creams may seem like a less irritating option, but they are strong chemical creams that dissolve hair bonds. 

3. Lasers are the most expensive, yet slightly painful option.
Painful and expensive, laser treatment is the most long-lasting option for hair removal — and an investment of Céline-bag proportions. Dr. Tanzi explains that lasers work by concentrating on the color in the root of the hair, which is why they tend to work better on people with thicker, darker hair. By heating it, the laser kills the hair follicle. It can take three to five sessions to see long-lasting results.

Contrary to what the internet may tell you, lasers can be an option for all skin tones. But as Dr. Carlos Charles explains, using an incorrect laser wavelength or technique can cause heat damage, which damages the skin surrounding hair follicles. “Specifically in darker skin tones, any trauma to the surrounding skin can lead to hyperpigmentation and sometimes scarring, including keloids.” Beware of LivingSocial laser-hair-removal deals and choose your doctor carefully.

4. Doctors say it’s okay to shave your face (really).
Shaving your face can make it glow, but dermatologists also consider this to be the ultimate option for providing skin with the least amount of trauma. Dr. Charles says: “When performed correctly, shaving leads to the least amount of trauma to the skin surrounding the hair.” As for the theory that shaving makes your hair grow back faster, Dr. Tanzi asserts it is a myth. “It doesn’t affect hair growth at all. Your hair grows same amount. It just feels stubbly. Your hair naturally has a soft and wispy end. But if you shave it, it comes back as a blunt end, feeling thicker. It grows at the same rate and thickness.” 

What causes ingrown pubic hairs?

When you remove hair, it usually grows back.

Most hair shafts will grow up through the skin without causing any problems. Other hairs may grow underneath the skin. For example, when you shave, the shortened hair can curl back and grow into your skin.

When hair grows back into the skin, the body responds to the hair as if it were a foreign object. That’s when symptoms begin, including pain, itching, redness, or swelling.

How are ingrown pubic hairs treated?

In most cases, you don’t need to treat ingrown pubic hairs. They’ll often clear up on their own without treatment.

If the hairs don’t start to grow back up through the skin, you may need to try one of the following treatment options.

1. Stop removing the hair in that area

Stop waxing, shaving, or plucking the hair in that area until the ingrown hair goes away.

Continuing to shave will aggravate the sensitive area even more. Scratching or picking at the ingrown hair will increase your discomfort. It could even lead to a skin infection or leave a scar.

2. Apply warm compresses

Place warm compresses on the area.

You can also rub a wet washcloth or soft toothbrush in a circular motion over the skin.

3. Gently pull out the hair

Once the hair emerges above the skin, use sterile tweezers or a needle to gently pull it.

Try not to pluck it out completely until the area is healed, or the skin will heal over the hair again. Don’t dig into your skin. Breaking through your skin could cause an infection.

4. Remove dead skin

Gently wash and exfoliate around the ingrown hair to help the hair return to the surface of the skin.

If that doesn’t work, your doctor might prescribe a drug that can help dead skin cells slough off more quickly.

5. Use creams to reduce inflammation

If the ingrown pubic hair is causing a lot of redness and inflammation, your doctor may prescribe a steroid cream. This topical treatment can reduce swelling and irritation around the hair.

6. Use retinoids

Retinoids, such as tretinoin (Renova, Retin-A), can speed up the clearing of dead skin cells. They may also help clear up dark skin patches that form because of the ingrown hair. You’ll need a prescription from your doctor for retinoids. These medicines can cause dry skin.

Don’t use any products with retinoids if you’re pregnant. This medication is dangerous to the baby and can cause birth defects.

What happens if the ingrown hairs get infected?

If the ingrown pubic hair gets infected, the bumps may be painful and filled with pus. To treat the infection, you may need to see your doctor.

Your doctor may prescribe an antibiotic ointment or wash. If the infection is severe, you might need to take an antibiotic by mouth.

What treatments can you try at home?

A few over-the-counter (OTC) and home remedies can relieve bumps and possibly prevent ingrown hairs. Here are a few to try.

OTC remedies:

  • Exfoliate with salicylic acid or glycolic acid. These products will help keep your hair follicles open, so the hairs don’t get trapped again. Don’t use these products if you already have an ingrown hair, because they could irritate the area.
  • Use a benzoyl peroxide cream. This ingredient found in OTC acne medicines can help dry up the affected area and reduce redness.
  • Moisturize. A non-greasy moisturizer can get rid of dead skin cells, which often clog follicles and contribute to ingrown hairs.

Home remedies:

  • Tea tree oil kills bacteria and brings down swelling. It’s sometimes used to treat acne, and it may also work for ingrown hairs. Mix the oil with water to dilute it, and apply using a cotton ball.
  • Sugar is a natural exfoliator. Mix it with olive oil or honey to moisturize the skin and kill bacteria. Apply the paste in a circular motion, and then rinse with warm water.
  • Baking soda helps to exfoliate and bring down inflammation in the skin. Mix 1 tablespoon of baking soda with 1 cup of water. Use a cotton ball to apply it to your skin, and then rinse with cold water.

What should you avoid doing if you have ingrown pubic hairs?

Here are some things to avoid if you have an ingrown hair:

  • Try not to pull or pick at the ingrown hair. You could cause an infection.
  • Don’t squeeze the bumps. Trying to pop the bumps could cause an infection or leave a scar.
  • Don’t dig under the skin. If you do try to remove the hair, do it gently.

How can you prevent ingrown pubic hairs?

The best way to prevent ingrown pubic hair is by not waxing, shaving, or plucking, but that’s not always practical.

If you do continue to groom your pubic hair, follow these steps to prevent future ingrown pubic hairs.

1. Prime the pubic area for shaving

Treating the pubic region before using a razor to shave may reduce your risk for ingrown hairs when the hair starts to grow back.

First, wash your skin with a mild soap. Rub on a lubricating shave cream or shave gel, or one that’s designed for sensitive areas.

When you’re finished, dry the area thoroughly before putting on your underwear and pants.

2. Use a single-bladed razor

Some razors are designed to reduce the risk of ingrown hairs. You can try one of these special razors, or just buy a single-bladed razor.

If your razor is several uses old, replace it with a fresh one. Dull blades don’t make clean, precise cuts and can increase your risk for an ingrown hair.

3. Consider laser hair removal

Though expensive, laser hair removal is a long-lasting solution to ingrown hairs. Laser hair removal removes hair at a deeper level, damaging the hair follicle. In most cases, that prevents the hair from growing back.

Laser hair removal requires several treatments over the course of a few weeks and months, but the results are usually semi-permanent. Laser removal isn’t as effective on blond or very light-colored hair.

4. Look into non-razor hair removal options

Chemical hair removers are an option, but they can irritate sensitive skin. Test the hair remover on a small patch of skin on another part of your body before using it on your pubic area. If you don’t have a reaction within 24 hours, it should be safe to use.

Keep in mind, the skin in the genital area is much more sensitive than the skin on your arm or leg.

Some prescription creams reduce hair regrowth, especially when you use them after laser or other hair removal treatments.

Electrolysis is a permanent hair removal treatment. It uses an electrode to destroy the hair root. Like laser hair removal, electrolysis requires several treatments over the course of a few weeks or months.

What are hair removers, and how do they get rid of unwanted fuzz?

It’s almost summer in the Northern Hemisphere. Temperatures are rising, swimming pools are opening, and bare arms and legs are emerging from winter clothing.

For some people, the start of shorts-and-swimsuit season means it’s time to get rid of body hair. These sunseekers have an array of techniques to turn to: hair removal creams, waxing and sugaring, lasers, and even a good ol’ pair of tweezers. Knowing how the various options work might help you decide which one to use.

Getting rid of body hair is a billion-dollar industry and growing worldwide. But depilatories are nothing new. Evidence indicates that prehistoric cultures used stones and shark teeth as crude razors. Some ancient Egyptians removed hair with tweezers, razors, and pumice stones and ripped it out with wax or sugar pastes, leaving behind only their eyebrows.

Chemical removers have ancient roots too. People living 6,000 to 7,000 years ago in what is now Turkey used hair removal creams made with quicklime (calcium oxide). Likewise, American Indians applied lye to get rid of their body hair, a practice colonists adopted. Bases like lye and quicklime hydrolyze nitrogen-containing amide bonds in hair’s proteins, breaking bristles down. Drain-clog removers work the same way.

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Not every historical hair removal tactic has survived, and for good reason. Inventor Albert C. Geyser successfully marketed a machine in the first half of the 20th century that could permanently remove hair with a dose of X-rays. It was quickly banned once the detrimental health effects of the radiation became apparent. A study in the 1970s attributed a full third of radiation-related cancers in women to devices like Geyser’s.

Today, the hair removal options available at home or at professional salons are safe and—depending on your tolerance—relatively painless.

Creams are a popular option for at-home removal. To understand how these work, you first have to understand hair. Hair is made of fibrous proteins called keratin, twisted like yarn or rope into long bundles. Keratin strands are cross-linked by covalent disulfide bonds and weaker hydrogen bonds. These are depilatory creams’ targets.

The active ingredients in brands Veet and Nair are salts of thioglycolic acid like potassium thioglycolate or calcium thioglycolate in combination with bases such as calcium, sodium, or potassium hydroxide. The bases serve two purposes. They cause the hair to swell, opening its keratin fibers to allow thioglycolate to penetrate. The bases also remove the proton on thioglycolate’s thiol group. Once thioglycolate’s proton leaves, its sulfur atom is free to attack the hair protein’s disulfide bonds. Break enough of those, and the hair degrades completely and can simply be wiped away.

Because of this mechanism of action, chemical hair removers are remarkably selective, studies have shown. Researchers tested Nair on thin, thick, and medium hair, and on cotton, rayon, and polyester fibers. All three strands of hair broke within 10 minutes, but the remover had no effect on the other fibers, none of which contain disulfide bonds.

Other experiments have shown that cream hair removers should have a pH between about 12.0 and 12.5 to make sure the products work quickly but aren’t so caustic that they burn the skin, which has a pH of 4.5–5.5. Dermatologist Meghan Feely says cream hair removers can cause chemical burns for some people. They should be used according to their directions to minimize risk.

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Because these chemicals are so effective, the book is basically closed on finding new depilatory agents, says Heike Hanau, a marketing manager for Merck KGaA, which used to supply calcium thioglycolate for hair removers. But she says chemists are still working to improve depilatories’ smell. One by-product of thioglycolate’s reaction with disulfide bonds is hydrogen sulfide, which smells like rotten eggs.

Waxing is another common method for hair removal that can be done at home or by a professional in a salon. Wax, a mixture of lipids and long alkanes, can come from bees, plants, or petroleum products. The long alkyl chains make the wax a malleable solid at or just above room temperature. For hair removal, the wax is generally heated and spread across the skin. As it cools and hardens, it traps hairs, and when it’s yanked away, it pulls them out or breaks them off.

Sugaring has emerged in recent years as a trendy alternative to waxing. It works by the same principle: Spread a thick paste across the skin, then pull it off, along with some hairs. Sugaring wax, as it’s sometimes called, can be made at home with a recipe candy makers will recognize: Heat a mixture of water, table sugar, and lemon juice to about 120 °C until it turns golden brown, otherwise known as caramelization.

In this reaction, water hydrolyzes table sugar, known to chemists as sucrose, splitting it into glucose and fructose. The acid in lemon juice acts as a catalyst by protonating the oxygen that links sucrose’s two halves, encouraging addition of a hydroxyl group from water. The product, the mixture of hydroxylated glucose and fructose, is known as invert sugar in the food world, and it crystallizes at a higher temperature than sucrose alone, making for a spreadable wax.

Fans of sugaring typically offer two arguments for why it’s better than waxing. First, it allegedly penetrates more deeply into hair follicles for more complete removal. Society of Cosmetic Chemists President Perry Romanowski says there’s no evidence to support that claim. How well it works and how much it hurts mostly come down to the skill of the person pulling the hair, he says. The second claim is that the paste adheres only to dead skin cells, not live ones, reducing irritation when it’s yanked away. American University’s Matthew Hartings, who studies food chemistry and is also a member of C&EN’s advisory board, is doubtful. “I’ve got a lifetime of trying to clean caramel off my hands that calls shenanigans on that,” he says.

And then there are lasers, the newest entrant in the hair-removal game. Professionals train these instruments, tuned to an infrared wavelength absorbed by the pigment melanin, on the hair that needs removing. Melanin gives hair—as well as skin—its color. The absorption heats up the hair, frying it down to its roots beneath the skin. It works best on dark hair against light skin, but experiments have shown that neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet lasers, which can focus more tightly than the diode lasers commonly used, can be effective on dark skin.

Hair-removing lasers require approval by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration before people can use them. Other hair-removing products may also if a bill introduced in the Senate becomes law. The Personal Care Products Safety Act would give FDA many of the same powers to regulate cosmetics that it currently has to regulate food. Companies would be required to disclose the ingredients in their products and give the agency jurisdiction to evaluate whether those ingredients are safe for people to use.

Because hair removal has a long history and most of the methods around today have been used for decades or millennia, depilatory methods are unlikely to change. Which product you prefer to remove a little hair here or there is probably less important than getting out there and enjoying summer.

How Hair Removal Creams Work

Basically, hair removal creams work by creating a chemical reaction when applied to hair. “This chemical reaction causes the hairs to swell and breaks the keratin proteins and disulfide bonds, which leaves the hair weak or dissolved in the hair follicle,” explains Diane Madfes, M.D., dermatologist and assistant professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Once the bonds are broken, hair can simply be wiped away, without the need for a razor or tweezers.

Hair removal creams, also called depilatory creams, dissolve the hair at the surface of the skin, similar to shaving. However, these creams go a step further and actually penetrate into the hair follicle, so the hair breaks off lower into the skin’s surface than shaving. This means you can go a few more days in between treatments (praise hands) — but the results still won’t last as long as waxing, which yanks the hair completely from the root. (If you prefer waxing, but can’t get to the salon, try the best at-home wax strips, according to customer reviews.)

Benefits of Hair Removal Creams

If you’re worried about using a hair removal cream on or near your more delicate areas such as the upper lip and bikini line, you should know that they are safe to use on all parts of the body. If you’ve never tried one of the best hair removal creams before, do a patch test on a small area on your inner arm, and wait 24 hours to ensure there is no irritation before proceeding with using the product, says Dr. Madfes.

Have sensitive skin? Dr. Madfes recommends creams that contain an anti-inflammatory ingredient, such as aloe vera, vitamin E, chamomile, or almond oil, to decrease irritation. While most people can use hair removal creams, those with skin conditions such as eczema or those who develop hives easily may want to be extra cautious, advises Dr. Madfes. Also, never use any of the best hair removal creams on sun-tanned skin and be sure to protect with sunscreen post-treatment since the chemicals in the creams can make your skin photosensitive, she adds.

The best thing about hair removal creams, though: They’re super affordable and easy to use from the comfort of your own bathroom, making them a genius method for saving you time and cash. (Want to save $$$ on another effective hair removing device? Reviewers say this $7 dermaplaning tool is better than a wax.)

The Best Hair Removal Creams, According to Customer Reviews

Whether you’re looking for an option for your face, legs, or bikini line, there’s a formula for you. So, toss that razor and try one of the best hair remover cream options instead.

Best Facial Hair Removal Cream: Sally Hansen Creme Hair Remover Duo Kit

hair removal cream sally hansen

CREDIT: AMAZON

Since the skin on your face is thinner and more delicate than the skin on your body, aftercare is essential. This kit comes with a cream that removes peach fuzz and reduces the appearance of hair regrowth — plus a second-step lotion that’s infused with plumping collagen and moisturizing vitamin E to hydrate, protect, and keep skin healthy-looking. One reviewer with sensitive skin noted that there was no redness post-use, and another applied it to their upper lip, chin, and unibrow and raved that the results looked as good as a wax — sure signs that it’s one of the best facial hair removal cream options. (Find more facial hair removal products, tools, and services here.)

Buy It: Sally Hansen Creme Hair Remover Duo Kit, $6, amazon.com

Best Hair Removal Cream for Underarms: Nair Glides Away Hair Removal Cream

hair removal cream nair

CREDIT: AMAZON

A stick format makes it easy to coat unwanted underarm hairs (or anywhere else on your body for that matter) with this best hair removal cream. Turn the dial to dispense the product, swipe on, and wait 3-10 minutes for the cream to work its magic. Then, gently wipe away the cream and hair with a damp washcloth. One customer with “crazy sensitive skin” said it was gentle enough to use on their underarms and bikini area, and that “the deodorant style bottle makes it perfect for applying.” Another shopper with “SUPER sensitive skin” wrote the cream didn’t burn them and worked well to even remove thick, coarse hair.

Buy It: Nair Glides Away Hair Removal Cream, $10, amazon.com

Best Hair Removal Cream for Bikini Area: Nad’s Sensitive Hair Removal Cream

hair removal cream nads

CREDIT: AMAZON

As anyone who has ever waxed or shaved ~down there~ knows, the skin around your bikini line can be sensitive AF. As one of the (if not the) best hair removal cream for private parts, this bad boy is packed with soothing and hydrating ingredients — including melon, aloe vera, avocado oil, and honey — to prevent redness and irritation. A reviewer swears it’s the answer for those with sensitive skin or prone to razor burn or ingrown hairs: “I used this on my bikini area 3x and haven’t had any issues!!”(Psst… here are 8 bikini trimmers for a super close shave without the razor burn.)

Buy It: Nad’s Sensitive Hair Removal Cream, $6, amazon.com

Best Hair Removal Cream for Legs: Veet Aloe Vera Legs & Body Hair Removal Gel Cream

hair removal cream veet

CREDIT: AMAZON

With a solid 4.3 rating on Amazon, this gel-cream is no doubt a good hair removal cream that’s worth trying. It’s packed with a hydrating combo of aloe vera and vitamin E, so it removes hair quickly without causing your skin to freak out (translation: perfect for sensitive skin) and leaves you feeling silky smooth. One customer shared that it removed their leg hair with zero allergic reactions (which, btw, is key for any skin-care product, be it one of the best hair removal creams or a serum for your face), and another said the cream left their legs smoother than shaving with a razor.

Buy It: Veet Aloe Vera Legs & Body Hair Removal Gel Cream, $18, amazon.com

Best Hair Removal Cream for Coarse Hair: GiGi Hair Removal Lotion

hair removal cream gigi

Enriched with cocoa butter, natural oils, and vitamins C and E, this best hair removal lotion nixes hair and moisturizes skin to leave it positively glowing post-treatment. Plus, cucumber and aloe vera extract soothe and calm the skin so you’re not left red and blotchy. But the main reason customers think this is the best hair removal lotion is because of its ability to remove even stubborn, thick, coarse hair. One shopper said, “I have coarse hair, so it’s been hard to find a hair removal lotion that works well. It’s strong enough for my legs, but gentle enough for my bikini area. Even if I leave it on longer than it says by mistake, my super sensitive skin has never broken out.”

Buy It: GiGi Hair Removal Lotion, $6, amazon.com

Best Moisturizing Hair Removal Cream: Neomen Hair Removal Cream

hair removal cream neomen

CREDIT: AMAZON

More than 4,000 five-star reviewers say this hair removal cream is the real deal. The gentle formula contains aloe vera and vitamin E — but also, interestingly enough, baby oil to leave your skin smoother than ever. Customers claim it’s the best hair removal cream for everything from their upper lip to legs and bikini line, and a ton of reviewers write that it’s pain-free and that it leaves skin incredibly soft. (In case you’re on the fence about permanent hair removal, here’s why one editor decided against laser treatments.)

Buy It: Neomen Hair Removal Cream, $11, $19amazon.com

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