traditional chinese clothing

If you are looking for the Traditional Chinese Clothing guide, then you are on the right page. It contains traditional chinese clothing for sale. Suppose you want the chinese clothing history instead. Then this article is what you need.

Traditional Chinese clothes were an evolution of their long, loose, straight-cut jackets and pants or gowns. They reflected traditional Chinese aesthetics, philosophy, and social values as they changed through over 3,000 years of history.

traditional chinese clothing for sale

Traditional Chinese Clothing

Each country in the world has its own unique traditional clothes, from which people are able to distinguish one country from another, and so it has been with China.

The Hanfu, Zhongshan suit (Mao suit), Tang suit, and cheongsam (qipao) are the four most distinctive types of traditional Chinese clothing.

1. Hanfu

HanfuHanfu

The Hanfu (‘Han clothing’ — the majority of Chinese are of Han ethnicity) is the oldest of China’s traditional clothes. Legend traces it back to over 4,000 years ago when Huangdi’s consort, Leizu, made cloth with silk. It was constantly improved throughout several dynasties.

Until the Han Dynasty, the Hanfu was adopted and vigorously promoted by the ruling class. It then became the national clothing of the Han ethnic people. It also had a far-reaching influence on neighboring Asian countries, such as Korea, Japan, and Vietnam.

2. Zhongshan Suit

Zhongshan SuitZhongshan Suit

The Zhongshan suit, also known as the Mao suit overseas, is a type of male attire. It was first advocated by Dr Sun Yat-sen (i.e. Sun Zhongshan, hence Zhongshan suit) after the founding of the Republic of China in 1912.

Later on, after Chairman Mao had been seen wearing it in public numerous times, this outfit gained the name “Mao suit”. Read more on the Zhongshan suit.

3. Tang Suit

Tang Suit

The Tang suit often refers to a type of Chinese jacket rather than the clothing of the Tang Dynasty (618–907). This name came from the overseas Chinese.

As the Tang Empire was famous for being prosperous and powerful in the world, foreigners called the overseas Chinese people “the Tang people” and the clothes they wore were called “Tang suits” (which has been translated as Tangzhuang 唐装). Read more about the Tang suit.

4. Cheongsam

The cheongsam (qipao) evolved from the Manchu women’s changpao (‘long gown’) of the Qing Dynasty (1644–1912). The Manchu ethnic people were also called the Qi people by the Han people; hence their long gown was named qipao (‘Qi gown’). 

5 Key Variations in Traditional Chinese Clothing

There were no fashion shows in ancient China. Traditional Chinese clothing was the outcome of people’s aesthetic tastes and social customs. It varied historically, regionally, and through the social hierarchy.

1. Design

Traditional Chinese clothes usually adopted a straight cut and were loose in shape. In addition, the overall harmony of the outfit was also emphasized.

2. Color

People normally wore light colored clothing in daily life. Red, bright yellow, and purple always exclusively belonged to the emperor and the imperial family. The mass people mostly wore red at weddings. Besides that, white clothing was normally worn at a funeral.

For example, for women, only an empress or official wives could wear true red while the color was prohibited to concubines.

3. Gender

Women’s clothing was more diverse than clothing for men. Compared to men’s clothing, women’s clothing had more ornaments, items, and styles.

4. Material

Chinese Traditional Clothing Material

At the very beginning, the ancient Chinese only covered their bodies with leaves. As agricultural development increased, more clothing material appeared. In later years, linen, cotton, and silk were the prominent materials.

During the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644), according to the government’s policy of physiocracy and restriction of business, businessmen were forbidden to wear silk clothing, even if they were rich.

chinese clothing history

Almost every dynasty had its own unique clothes, some of which were really exquisite beyond compare. 

The 2 Basic Forms of Traditional Chinese Clothes

Generally, traditional Chinese clothes had two basic forms: top-bottom clothes and one-piece clothes.

Two-Piece Clothing

The top-bottom clothes, consisting of an yi (衣 upper garment) and a chang (裳 lower garment) were the earliest form of clothing recorded in Chinese documents. This two-piece clothing is said to date back to legendary Huangdi’s reign (2697–2597 BC).

The yi refers to any open cross-collar garment worn by both sexes, where the right side was wrapped over the left, and the shang refers to any skirt worn by both sexes, highlighted by a belt hanging from the side.

One-Piece Clothing

Chinese Traditional Clothing

The one-piece clothing was called shenyi (deep robe) and can be traced back to the late Zhou Dynasty (1046–221 BC). The yi and the shang were sewn as one piece although they were cut separately.

The shenyi was widely adopted by various dynasties throughout the history of China. It was considered to be formal dress in the Han Dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD), and it still has a great influence on modern-day one-piece clothing.

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Dress Codes & What They Mean [Infographic] – His & Her Guide To Appropriate Attire For Each Dress Code

With so much happening in Saratoga, especially during the summer season, deciding what to wear isn’t always easy. You’re invited to a gala… or a fundraiser… or a seminar luncheon, and the dress code is spelled right out for you in black and white, but what does it really mean? How do you actually translate it into something you can put on your body?

Dress codes can be difficult to decipher at times (particularly when some of them mean the opposite of what you can deduce from looking the words up in Webster’s Dictionary), so below is a run-down of the common U.S. dress codes and what they mean. We offer you this dress code infographic with his-and-her attire photos to guide you through and suggest what might be appropriate to wear for an occasion with the corresponding dress code.

Are you ready? Hold onto your hat… or black tie… whatever the occasion may be! Here’s our simple breakdown of different dress codes and what they mean in U.S. culture, from casual to business casual to smart casual to business and informal, semi-formal and formal attire. We invite you to bookmark this page, pin this image to Pinterest or share via other social media channels for future reference. (click to enlarge)

visual representation of dress codes described in text on the page below the image

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Share This! Our Quick Guide To Dress Codes Infographic is meant to be shared, and you are welcome to do so. All we ask is that you credit us as the source with a link back to this page.

De-Coding: Dress Codes 101 – Quick Guide To Dress Codes And What They Mean For Him & Her

“Casual”

Casual is basically a non-dress code, and you can wear comfortable clothing.

For Him: Think Homer Simpson. Tee shirt, jeans and sneakers are appropriate. You may also opt to step it up a notch with khakis, cargos, a polo shirt or henley and still fit in just fine. Tip: Avoid inflammatory or otherwise offensive graphic tees!

For Her: Pull out your favorite jeans! You can opt for a comfortable tee or dress things up a bit with a stylish top, jewelry or even a blazer. Depending on the nature of the event, your footwear can range safely from sneakers to heels to boots. Tip: For outdoor events, sneakers are better as heels can sink into soft ground.

“Business Casual”

Business Casual is what many people would typically wear to work at the office.

For Him: Wear a pair of nice khakis paired with a polo shirt or other collared shirt. Dress shoes or loafers are appropriate. Tip: Avoid the wrinkles; iron your shirt and pants! Patterned collared shirts are a nice option for a less dressy feel than their solid counterparts.

For Her: Dress pants or khakis with a fashionable top is appropriate. A casual skirt is also an option. Feel free to dress up your outfit with heels, jewelry and/or accessories if desired. Tip: Wear your hair in your everyday style, and avoid overdoing it with makeup or perfume.

“Smart Casual”

Smart Casual (or dressy casual) is basically a combination of casual, business casual, and business dress codes, where you can combine them into a “smart” ensemble.

For Him: This is your opportunity to pair denim with a sport coat. Khakis, trousers, vests, and ties are other great options to bring into the mix. Tip: If opting for jeans, your denim should look somewhat dressy, fresh and sharp with no wear or holes.

For Her: It’s safest to go with nice slacks or a skirt, though you could also wear a nice pair of dark jeans dressed up with a collared or otherwise dressy top. Throw on a blazer for an extra touch of class. Tip: For Smart Casual, you should look sharp, stylish, and neatly put together.

“Business / Informal”

Informal attire may be a misnomer as it does call for a bit of formality (not to be confused with Casual attire). Business and Informal attire is more sophisticated than Smart Casual, often signaling the need for suits, ties and dresses.

For Him: Wear a business suit with tie. You may also opt for nice slacks with a sports jacket and tie.

For Her: Wear a business suit or business style dress with heels (high or low).

Tip: For Business and Informal dress codes, stick to business colors: black, navy blue, gray or brown.

“Semi-Formal”

Semi-formal attire is more fancy than business attire but just a notch below formal tuxedos and fancy gowns.

For Him: Wear a dark suit with long tie. Tip: The more formal the dress code, the less expression you are allowed in determining your attire options; this is particularly true for men.

For Her: This is the perfect time to break out that little black dress. Most women will wear a classy short evening dress, though you may also opt for dressy separates. Tip: Ladies should avoid very short dresses and skirts that are shorter than 1 inch above the knee.

“Formal / Black Tie / Black Tie Optional”

Formal, Black Tie and Black Tie Optional events are among the most fancy of all dress codes, and you will likely be surrounded by a crowd full of tuxedos and floor-length gowns.

For Him: Wear a tuxedo with all the frills (vest/cummerbund, cufflinks, etc.) For Black Tie Optional, you may also opt to wear a black suit with white shirt and conservative tie. Tip: A Black Tie dress code does not necessarily limit you to only “black” ties, but you may opt for a black tux with any matching tie/cummerbund color of your choosing.

For Her: You are safest wearing a long, floor-length evening dress. A very fancy dress that is not floor-length may also be appropriate. Tip: Wear your hear in an elegant updo or partial updo, and put on fancy jewelry for this occasion.

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