traditional dress of russia

Worried about getting the best Traditional Dress Of Russia? This is a detailed research on russian costume ideas. If your preference is russian clothing facts, then this article is perfect for you.

Russian traditional dress began to develop as a specific form in the 9th century. Until the early 18th century, peasants and boyars (noblemen) wore traditional costumes. In 1700, Tsar Peter the Great, with his admiration for all things from Western Europe, prohibited wearing traditional dress in cities. It was the Russian peasantry who preserved the richness and beauty of traditional Russian dress.

russian costume ideas

Traditional Dress Of Russia

Peasant Woman's Dress (Poneva and Shirt), late 19th-early 20th century. Voronezh region, Russia. Private Collection of Susan Johnson. See item description for specific details.
Peasant Woman's Dress (Sarafan and Shirt), Early-mid 19th century. Vologda region, Russia; Shirt: Northern Dvina River Basin, Sarafan: Tarnoga. Private Collection of Susan Johnson. See item description for specific details.

There are two major types of Russian ethnic dress: the sarafan and the poneva. A sarafan is a loosely fitting long jumper dress worn over a long linen shirt and belted. A necessary component of traditional Russian dress, the belt was often worn under the sarafan. Sarafans were made from homespun linen or inexpensive printed cotton produced in the large textile factories of Moscow, Ivanovo and Vladimir regions. For special occasions, they could be made from brocades and silks and embroidered with gold and silver thread.

Sarafans were widespread in the northern provinces of the Russian Empire such as Vologda, Arkhangelsk, Pskov and Novgorod. The poneva skirt costume was commonly worn in the provinces south of Moscow, such as Tula, Voronezh, and Tambov. The poneva costume is considered to be the more ancient of the two. It consisted of the plaid or striped poneva skirt gathered on a string or wrapped around the hips, a long loosely fitting shirt with embroidered sleeves and an apron heavily decorated with lace and colorful trims. The scarf or traditional headdress was a mandatory element of the peasant outfit. On display are outfits originating from several distinct areas in northern, southern and central Russia.

russian clothing facts

Dress Codes & What They Mean [Infographic] – His & Her Guide To Appropriate Attire For Each Dress Code

With so much happening in Saratoga, especially during the summer season, deciding what to wear isn’t always easy. You’re invited to a gala… or a fundraiser… or a seminar luncheon, and the dress code is spelled right out for you in black and white, but what does it really mean? How do you actually translate it into something you can put on your body?

Dress codes can be difficult to decipher at times (particularly when some of them mean the opposite of what you can deduce from looking the words up in Webster’s Dictionary), so below is a run-down of the common U.S. dress codes and what they mean. We offer you this dress code infographic with his-and-her attire photos to guide you through and suggest what might be appropriate to wear for an occasion with the corresponding dress code.

Are you ready? Hold onto your hat… or black tie… whatever the occasion may be! Here’s our simple breakdown of different dress codes and what they mean in U.S. culture, from casual to business casual to smart casual to business and informal, semi-formal and formal attire. We invite you to bookmark this page, pin this image to Pinterest or share via other social media channels for future reference. (click to enlarge)

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De-Coding: Dress Codes 101 – Quick Guide To Dress Codes And What They Mean For Him & Her

“Casual”

Casual is basically a non-dress code, and you can wear comfortable clothing.

For Him: Think Homer Simpson. Tee shirt, jeans and sneakers are appropriate. You may also opt to step it up a notch with khakis, cargos, a polo shirt or henley and still fit in just fine. Tip: Avoid inflammatory or otherwise offensive graphic tees!

For Her: Pull out your favorite jeans! You can opt for a comfortable tee or dress things up a bit with a stylish top, jewelry or even a blazer. Depending on the nature of the event, your footwear can range safely from sneakers to heels to boots. Tip: For outdoor events, sneakers are better as heels can sink into soft ground.

“Business Casual”

Business Casual is what many people would typically wear to work at the office.

For Him: Wear a pair of nice khakis paired with a polo shirt or other collared shirt. Dress shoes or loafers are appropriate. Tip: Avoid the wrinkles; iron your shirt and pants! Patterned collared shirts are a nice option for a less dressy feel than their solid counterparts.

For Her: Dress pants or khakis with a fashionable top is appropriate. A casual skirt is also an option. Feel free to dress up your outfit with heels, jewelry and/or accessories if desired. Tip: Wear your hair in your everyday style, and avoid overdoing it with makeup or perfume.

“Smart Casual”

Smart Casual (or dressy casual) is basically a combination of casual, business casual, and business dress codes, where you can combine them into a “smart” ensemble.

For Him: This is your opportunity to pair denim with a sport coat. Khakis, trousers, vests, and ties are other great options to bring into the mix. Tip: If opting for jeans, your denim should look somewhat dressy, fresh and sharp with no wear or holes.

For Her: It’s safest to go with nice slacks or a skirt, though you could also wear a nice pair of dark jeans dressed up with a collared or otherwise dressy top. Throw on a blazer for an extra touch of class. Tip: For Smart Casual, you should look sharp, stylish, and neatly put together.

“Business / Informal”

Informal attire may be a misnomer as it does call for a bit of formality (not to be confused with Casual attire). Business and Informal attire is more sophisticated than Smart Casual, often signaling the need for suits, ties and dresses.

For Him: Wear a business suit with tie. You may also opt for nice slacks with a sports jacket and tie.

For Her: Wear a business suit or business style dress with heels (high or low).

Tip: For Business and Informal dress codes, stick to business colors: black, navy blue, gray or brown.

“Semi-Formal”

Semi-formal attire is more fancy than business attire but just a notch below formal tuxedos and fancy gowns.

For Him: Wear a dark suit with long tie. Tip: The more formal the dress code, the less expression you are allowed in determining your attire options; this is particularly true for men.

For Her: This is the perfect time to break out that little black dress. Most women will wear a classy short evening dress, though you may also opt for dressy separates. Tip: Ladies should avoid very short dresses and skirts that are shorter than 1 inch above the knee.

“Formal / Black Tie / Black Tie Optional”

Formal, Black Tie and Black Tie Optional events are among the most fancy of all dress codes, and you will likely be surrounded by a crowd full of tuxedos and floor-length gowns.

For Him: Wear a tuxedo with all the frills (vest/cummerbund, cufflinks, etc.) For Black Tie Optional, you may also opt to wear a black suit with white shirt and conservative tie. Tip: A Black Tie dress code does not necessarily limit you to only “black” ties, but you may opt for a black tux with any matching tie/cummerbund color of your choosing.

For Her: You are safest wearing a long, floor-length evening dress. A very fancy dress that is not floor-length may also be appropriate. Tip: Wear your hear in an elegant updo or partial updo, and put on fancy jewelry for this occasion.

The Guide: Dressing For Your Body Shape

Trends change fast, and it’s not always easy to know how to adapt them for our unique (and beautiful!) body shapes. We believe that fashion is about feeling great in the looks we love and feeling great in who we are. But, you could say that we follow guidelines, not rules. So we created this handy guide to help you learn how to dress your body shape and play up your most favorite features with styles you have (or should have) in your closet. But first things first, do you know your body shape?

The Stitch Fix Body Calculator

But wait, are you wondering what your body shape even is? Grab a tape measure! We designed this nifty calculator to help you get started.

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Now, read on for more tips for styling your shape!

PEAR SHAPED BODY TYPE

aka a triangle shape. 

pear shape body type guide

You may be this body type if…

  • Your waist is wider than your bust
  • You consider yourself to have fuller hips
  • You have narrower shoulders in comparison to your hips
  • You have a fuller rear

Learn how to dress your pear shape

HOURGLASS SHAPED BODY TYPE

aka a curvy shape. 

hourglass body shape guide

You may be this body type if…

  • You’d describe your body as curvy
  • You have a well-defined waist
  • Your bust and hip measurements are roughly even
  • You may have fuller bust, hips, and thighs

Learn how to dress your hourglass shape

APPLE SHAPED BODY TYPE

aka an inverted triangle. 

apple shaped body guide

You may be this body type if…

  • You are generally well-proportioned
  • Your shoulders are broader than your hips
  • You are not necessarily as curvy through your hips
  • You don’t have a well-defined waistline (If you do, you’re likely an hourglass!)

Learn how to dress your apple shape

ATHLETIC SHAPED BODY TYPE

aka a rectangle or straight shape.

athletic body shape guide

You may be this body type if…

  • You’re not particularly curvy
  • Your shoulders and hip measurements are nearly the same
  • Your waist isn’t very small or well-defined, but rather straight up and down
  • Your weight is fairly evenly distributed throughout your body

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